Dennis Quaid Moving The Family From Hollywood

Dennis Quaid is ready to leave Tinseltown. He’s not retiring from acting, but he and his family are moving.

“The train is going down the tracks!” he said.

Dennis and his wife, Kimberly, are planning to uproot their family, which includes 7-month-old twins Thomas Boone and Zoe Grace to his hometown of Houston.

“We have a lot of family there and we have a really nice plot of land. We have 30 or 40 friends and family members within two miles of us. Its kind of a no-brainer.”

Leaving Los Angeles is sure to put bad memories behind for the couple. Last November, their twins came close to death from an accidental overdose of the drug Heparin. Thomas and Zoe were given 10,000 units of Heparin as newborns. The normal dosage for infants is 10 units. The babies were treated and have recovered from the overdose.

“They went through a medical catastrophe. Thank God it had a happy ending,” Dennis said. “We took them [kids] to the kiddie pool for their first swim today. They loved it.”

Dennis and Kimberly have since taken action to prevent such medical nightmares from happening again by establishing a foundation to minimize the impact of human error.

“We would like to start by bar coding,” he said. “With a bar code, [a nurse] can scan the medicine and scan the bracelet of the patient. Scan her own tag and if theres a mistake, it will come up.”

Souce: OK Magazine

Photo: Pacific Coast News

Filed under: Uncategorized

1 Comment »»

Post a Comment

  1. Jasmin

    Well, I’m really deeply sorry about their newborns going through such thing. Human error is a huge downside when it comes to practicing medicine.
    But, -there’s always a but- barcoding the medicine, inputting the patient data in the system, and running each item through scanning devices would extend the amount of time for patient care and service hugely.
    In the case of emergencies, you would be disappointed if the nurse was reaching out for the scanning device instead of your immediate care. Hospitals are not warehouses, and patients are definitely not still life packages.
    I hope their foundation comes up with another human-error-reducing-method.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>