Ricki Lake Reacts To Doctors’ Statements On Home Births

Actress Ricki Lake, the Producer of The Business of Being Born, a documentary based on the benefits of home birth and midwifery care, has recently been put in the middle of a conflict between the ACOG (The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists) and the AMA (American Medical Association).

Ricki’s documentary features footage of her home birth of son Owen, now 7. Lake is accusing doctors’ groups of targeting her strong views on the benefits of midwifery care and home births.

The dispute started with a recent statement from the ACOG,

“much attention in the media by celebrities having home deliveries” and pointing to a January Today show segment in which Ricki discussed her film and Owen’s birth.

Ricki has explained numerous times that she is neither “anti-doctor, nor “anti-hospital”. Lake, 39, told the Associated Press that she simply wants to raise awareness for women,

“Home birth was around long before hospitals were taking over – and I just think women need to know (the information) so that they can make the best choice for them.”

The AMA issued a statement last month in support of the ACOG’s official recommendation,

“The safest setting for labor, delivery, and the immediate post-partum period is in the hospital.”

In reaction to these statements, Ricki responded that her agenda is to provide choice for women,

“It’s scary that both (the ACOG and the AMA) have sort of targeted me. And, you know, I’m all about choice. This is not unlike the abortion issue. I am pro-choice when it comes to childbirth and choices in birth.”

Ricki feels that both parties have missed the point of the documentary, which is expressing that all women should have a choice of what environment they would like to give birth in.

In regards to her own home birth, Ricki said it was an incredible experience,

“[I was] empowered, I was transformed and I would love for women to have had that opportunity”

Ricki’s first son Milo,10, was born in the hospital, and Owen,7, was born at home.

Source: People

Photo: Babytalk Magazine via Ok! Magazine, May 23

Filed under: Uncategorized

4 Comments »»

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  1. Kim

    Enough with these doctors………..I had my three children at home long before it was gleaning so much attention ( my sons are 25,24 & 18) If doctors wouldn’t interfere so much there would be MORE women having natural childbirth & less women having “difficult” births; most of which are caused by common hospital practices & doctors’ schedules (and women’s need for scheduling everything (EVERYTHING!) lately

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  2. jan

    ya, 99% of the time spontaneous vaginal deliveries occur. that is why our civilization continues. it is that 1% of the time when things go wrong that we are fortunate to have medical settings. if you hemmorhage postpartum at home, and your baby is limp, who is going to do cpr on either? who is going to risk a chance of problems at home occuring? we are highly advanced with technical care in labor and delivery units, yet can also provide home settings. that gives people the best of both worlds. have your baby in a safe setting, recover, be stable and then go home

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  3. Lily

    Midwives are trained to take care of a lot of emergency situations, and MOST midwives work within a short distance to a hospital and have a professional relationship with a local OB/GYN. Being misinformed on what home birth with a midwife entails is the reason why people are so afraid of this option. It’s not for everyone, but yes, it is just as safe as a hospital when the pregnancy is low risk. It is illegal for any midwife to provide sole prenatal care to a medium/high-risk pregnancy.

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  4. Anonymous

    real stars have done home births for decades it’s nothing new

    Reply

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