Jenny McCarthy: “Autism Kicked Me In The Butt”

Jenny McCarthy: "Autism Kicked Me In The Butt"

Author, actress, activist and mom Jenny McCarthy recently chatted with Hello! Canada about everything from her ex Jim Carrey (they’re still on good terms) to her 8-year-old son Evan (he’s “no longer autistic”) to her very busy career. Here are a few of the interview highlights…

On her son Evan: “He’s recovered. He’s no longer autistic. As a parent, you really have to be proactive when your child is diagnosed. Doctors don’t know everything.”

On her split from Jim: “Yes, we still speak. We were always fine. But I will be honest: no matter whose idea it was to break up, it’s always hard. Luckily, we’ve been able to mend our hearts and move on gracefully. We still keep in contact. We check up on each other to make sure we’re both doing well.”

On having more kids: “I always thought I’d have three children, [but] autism kicked me in the butt. I’m really exhausted. It really drained me… Evan wants a sibling, but I say, ‘Let’s just by you a doll!’”

Filed under: Jenny McCarthy

Photo credit: VAH/Fame Pictures

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  1. Anonymous

    Autism cannot be cured. If he was “cured” he wasn’t autistic. I’m sure that whatever special needs he had WERE certainly a struggle for her, but I think it discredits actual families of autistic children to claim they can be “cured”.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      I agree.

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      Thank you! I really can’t stand Jenny McCarthy. She manages to make her voice heard over that of the medical community and fills peoples’ heads with ideas about vaccines causing autism and curing autism with a diet change. Her son was misdiagnosed. I don’t know why she can’t admit that.

      Reply
      • Shauna

        They dont know what causes Autism. If they dont know what causes it, they dont know what cures it. Therefore you really dont know that she didnt cure it. If her son was misdiagnosed then my question to you is……….maybe there are LOTS more that are misdiagnosed. MAYBE they could possibly be cured to.

        She has been AMAZING for the Autism community.

        Reply
    • Twyla

      He was diagnosed as autistic. He is no longer autistic. There’s nothing in the definition of autism that says it’s not autism if the person recovers.

      Jenny worked very hard with some of the best professionals around to find treatments to help her son. The change in him is amazing and should be cause for celebration and for study.

      Reply
    • belle

      I agree. I applaud her advocacy for her son. but she is doing the autistic community a huge disservice by saying that her son was cured.

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      Oh my word. You are so ignorant. Autism CAN, in some cases, be cured. Autism is a developmental delay. Once the child has, through intensive intervention (often behavioural therapy), caught up on developmental milestones and no longer displays enough symptoms to qualify for a diagnosis, he/she is CURED. Do not speak of that which you do not know.

      Reply
    • KATHY

      Jenny – you’re great. I would absolutely love to sit and have drinks with you any night – BUT! Would you be willing to have a super quick chat about the difference between AUTISM and ASPERGER’s? I am becoming increasingly concerned about the fact that the definition for Autism is blurred. Please bring me into the conversation. I am a huge advocate for what you are saying and I feel that you are not appropriately being voiced. Just a little (bit meaningful and mighty voice) from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Regards,
      Kathy

      Reply
  2. Anonymous

    Oh wow she’s annoying. I bet she had her kid with NO HELP from doctors right? and when she gets sick, who needs medication? If she gets cancer (God forbid) is she going to deny the need for chemotherapy too?

    Reply
    • Twyla

      She never said that she recovered him without any help from doctors. She worked closely with pediatrician Dr. Jerry Kartzinel, expresses a lot of gratitute and respect for him, and in fact wrote a book with him. But, she did not receive much help at all from the mainstream doctors she saw before finding Dr. Kartzinel. Many parents report similar experiences.

      Cancer is much better understood by mainstream medicine than autism, perhaps because cancer is not an iatrogenic condition.

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        “Cancer is much better understood by mainstream medicine than autism, perhaps because cancer is not an iatrogenic condition.”

        Are you stating this as fact, or would you care to add a disclaiming that the implication autism is an iatrogenic condition is entirely your own opinion? To quote you, “that is an empty statement devoid of fact and devoid of any citation to back it up.”

        Reply
  3. mackenzie

    He’s recovered. He’s no longer autistic. a child cant recovered from autism . she giving parents of autistic children false hope.

    Reply
  4. Anonymous

    I agree with the other posters that autistic children can not be cured. I have two autistic sons and work with autistic children and they’re wonderful guys and gals and don’t need to be cured anyway. Still Jenny is clearly in denial and maybe I don’t blame her. She thinks she cured her son and that’s given her a god complex that as an aging and untalented actress is really important. She used to get attention with her body, then her autistic son, then Jim Carrey and now her cured son. It’s her way to deal with not being talented or having accomplished anything important on her own.

    Still I hope that most parents of recently diagnosed autistic children won’t buy into the cure cr*p. Just love your kid and help them adjust to a world they don’t completely understand. That’s why I’m glad Jenny’s son doesn’t really have autism because she’d torment the poor child trying to cure him forever, just because it would give her something to pat herself on the back for. It’s sad.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      Very insightful comment! I am not a parent of any children with autism, but I do work with them. It is a wonderful experience. I have no reason to believe that they’re unhappy being “autistic”. Autism is not cancer.

      Reply
    • An30

      Great response! My son was diagnosed with Asperger’s (a milder form of autism) about two years ago, and although we both know there will be plenty of struggles down the road, I wouldn’t change my son for the world!

      Reply
    • Twyla

      Some people with autism are happy and able to function. That’s great. Some people with autism are very unhappy, have serious health conditions, cannot communicate, cannot be gainfully employed or have friends or graduate from high school. It is a spectrum. To say that everyone with autism should be accepted as they are and therefore not receive treatments would be stupid. Some people with autism benefit tremendously from dietary intervention, supplements, and detoxification. See h t t p : / / w w w . talkaboutcuringautism.org/index.htm

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        “Some people with autism benefit tremendously from dietary intervention, supplements, and detoxification.”

        There has been no demonstrated effect from these interventions, and no theoretical or medical justification for putting a child through them. Cognitive/behavioral therapy, on the other hand, has statistically demonstratable effects, especially when started early. Yet this is barely mentioned in your link to the “Talk About Curing Autism” website. Why? Why is its focus on chelation, GFCF diets, supplements, and other implausible treatments? Why are there pages dedicated to explaining why DAN doctors are so expensive, and how parents can afford a GFCF diet?

        Reply
        • Twyla

          Actually, the TACA site does have quite a bit of info on ABA, such as here:
          h t t p : / / w w w . talkaboutcuringautism.org/learning/startaba.htm

          There has been a whole lot of demonstrated effect from dietary interventions, supplements, and chelation. Chelation is more expensive, has some risks, and must be supervised by a qualified practitioner who montitors levels such as zinc and monitors kidney/liver function. Certainly chelation does not benefit everyone, but it benefits some people tremendously. Dietary intervention on the other hand is not risky (as long the diet is a nutritious well rounded) and does not have to be expensive. And there are a number of nutritional supplements which are worth trying at little to no risk and not exhorbitantly expensive. There is plenty of theoretical and medical justification, as shown in books by Dr. Bryan Jepson, Dr. Jaquelyn McCandless, Dr. Sydney Baker, Dr. Kenneth Bock, Karen Serroussi, Karen DeFelice, and the Autism Research Instititue.

          Reply
          • Anonymous

            No. The only fully controlled study to date found that eliminating casein and gluten from the diets of autistic children produces no change in their behavior, sleep, or bowel patterns.

            http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/index.cfm?id=2860

            Besides which, the tests and interventions DAN doctors carry out are invasive and traumatic for the children, and they provide no useful information.

            “Certainly chelation does not benefit everyone, but it benefits some people tremendously.”

            No kidding. I suppose the death of Tariq Nadama is just an example of one child who “didn’t benefit”. There is no theoretical basis through which chelation could possibly help autistic children. Even if you accept that autistic children have mercury poisoning – which they don’t – chelation doesn’t remove mercury from the brain once damage has already occurred. In fact, it might actually cause the release of mercury from other parts of the body, resulting in increased exposure to the brain. It’s only useful immediately following heavy metal poisoning.

            “Dietary intervention on the other hand is not risky (as long the diet is a nutritious well rounded)”

            This is a big “if” statement. Casein and gluten free diets often run dangerously close to depriving children of calcium and vitamin D and have been associated with the development of osteoporosis in autistic children (http://www.healthimize.com/news/NIH_Will_Use_60_Million_in_Recovery_Act_Funds_to_Support_Strategic_Autism_Research%20_75.html) Giving supplements willy nilly can produce all sorts of unforeseen complications, with damage to the liver and kidney. No drug, whether “natural” or not, is ever without risk, especially when given by parents desperate to see a difference – any difference – in their child.

            We’ve seen the same pattern again and again in treatment of autism. Parents are being exploited by these false hopes. Remember secretin? Nobody talks about that any more, do they?

          • Twyla

            The GFCF study you mentioned has been roundly criticized for being very small (only 14 subjects) and flawed in methodology.
            Another study concluded that the GFCFdiet does have beneficial impact:
            h t t p : / / w w w . foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Diet/can_autism_diet_help_autistic_children_2105100646.html

            Dr. Bryan Jepson says in his book “Changing the Course of Autism”:
            “An association between gluten and casein in the diet and autistic behavior in children was first recognized in the medical literature in 1980. As with many new observations on autism, it was brought to scientific attention by the parents of affected children. Since then, many studies have documented high levels of gluten- and casein-derived opioid peptides in children with autism, as well as clinical improvement in behavior after the removal of these foods. Each of these studies has some methodological flaws that preclude them from being considered definitive. But in light of the positive clinical reports from doctors (including me) who are regularly prescribing this diet, as well as from parents, a clinical trial is warranted.

            “My experience has been that a trial of a strict GF/CF (gluten- and casein-free) diet for a minimum of several months is an important early intervention in the treatment of the disease. It’a not uncommon to see immediate and obvious improvement in eye contact, attention, focus, behaviors, language, sleep, and bowel function. I also frequently see an immediate decrease in upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections, and eczema.”

          • Anonymous

            “The GFCF study you mentioned has been roundly criticized…”

            Aside from the number of participants, what specific methodological flaws can you point out? It was tightly controlled. Come to that, other double-blind placebo-controlled studies are showing no effect from these diets. Look up Elder et al.

            As for your liberal quoting from the works of Bryan Jepson, the words “in my experience” at the top of paragraph two are the most telling. One man’s anecdotal evidence is not convincing.

            By the way, I can quote too. http://ncp.sagepub.com/content/23/6/581.short

            “…The GFCF diet is contrary to that ancient medical principle, “First do no harm.” There are data to suggest that children on the GFCF diet may have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and reduced bone cortical thickness. Because children on these diets have not been extensively studied with regard to their long-term nutrition status, it can be assumed that these will not be the only problems associated with the GFCF diet.

            The only possible nutrition parallel to the use of the GFCF diet in autism is celiac disease, which is treated with a lifelong restrictive gluten-free diet. In celiac disease, because of the rigors involved in adhering to such a restrictive diet for life, the diet is started only after a definitive diagnosis (based on strict criteria) has been made. In our predominantly processed-food world, elimination of gluten can be difficult, if not impossible. For instance, most cereals, breads, soups, and snack foods typically contain gluten. Extending the parallel to the GFCF diet, in addition to all gluten-containing foods, all casein-containing products must be eliminated. Removing foods from 2 different food groups can make achieving a balanced diet difficult.

            Given the present state of the literature, it is hard to find evidence to support the GFCF diet. We do not believe that parents of children with autism are likely to agree; however, we are on the side of the autistic children, and we first wish to do them no harm.”

          • Twyla

            re: “…The GFCF diet is contrary to that ancient medical principle, ‘First do no harm.’” That’s absolutely ridiculous! There are many people around the world who don’t eat wheat and milk! And if a child is low on calcium or vitamin D, take supplements! As mentioned previously, there are a large variety of healthy foods available when on this diet.

            Yes, this diet does require cooking more from scratch as many packaged foods contain small amounts of gluten. But cooking from scratch can be a good thing. And, there are more and more gluten free foods commonly available.

            It’s not hard at all to find evidence to support the GFCF diet. Just try it, and observe your child. There’s the evidence for or against, in a study of one, the one who means the most to you.

            Not all science has to do with crunching numbers.

          • Twyla

            Dr. Jaquelyn McCandless says in her book “Children with Starving Brains”:
            “Scientific studies are pointing to inflammation in the gut being caused by gluten, casein, soy, and other foods. This is not an ‘allergy’ from the perspective of a traditional allergist, but what is called T-cell inflammatory response to these foods. In a study conducted by Dr. H. Jyonouchi fromt he University of Minnesota, it was shown that 75% of the children with autism specturm disorder have T-cell reactivity to foods.

            “Regardless of the theories, clinical experience of many DAN! physicians has identified the GF/CF diet as the single most effective action you can take on your own to begin to help your child. In my practice, I have found that almost every child with autism placed on this diet benefits from it. Many parents of my young patients have reported that their children’s chronic diarrhea stopped and the apperance of formed stools began after successful implementation of the GF/CF diet, particularly when any current yeast infections was treated at the same time. Many other parents report that potty training was finally achieved within a few weeks after the child began a GF/CF diet.

            “Many parents also report that their children are better able to mentally focus and show improvement in their capacity to learn as a result of the diet… Improvements such as these may be due to the fact that intestinal pathology has an effect on brain function; gut-brain interactions have been well described by numerous researchers.”

          • Twyla

            People on gluten-free/casein-free/soy-free diets can eat meat, fish, chicken, fruit, vegetables, beans, rice, potatoes, and grains such as quinoa, buckwheat, and amaranth. There is no reason for a person on a GFCFSF diet to be malnourished. Calcium and vitamin D can be received via supplements, and from fortified rice milk and almond milk.

            Cow’s milk is designed for calves. We are the only animal that continues drinking milk through adulthood and drinks milk from another species (cows) regularly. Humans evolved drinking only human milk, through early childhood.

            Before starting this diet, many children with autism are addicted to a narrow range of foods such as pizza, milk, chicken nuggets. But after adjusting to this diet, digestion becomes more normalized and many children begin eating a much better variety of foods than before.

            As Dr. McCandless says, “To repeat, the majority of the parents of my young patients report significant improvements in sleep patterns, behavior, language, eye contact, attention span and ability to focus and a decrease in ‘stimming’ in their children after starting this regimen.”

            The majority, but not everyone! As in all autism treatments, what benefits one person may not benefit another. But it’s worth a try.

          • Twyla

            Yes, Tariq Nadama died from chelation. His doctor used an IV push and accidentally gave him a type of EDTA that removes calcium. This was a medical error. An IV push is a very fast, sudden way of administering a chelator, and the sudden drop in calcium caused his heart to fail. This tragic error is brought up over and over again to discredit chelation, while the more common deaths from mainstream drugs such as Risperdal and ritalin are ignored.

            Dr. Martha Herbert from Harvard University said:
            “my position on chelation is a consequence of science. There is no doubt that it serves to reduce the body burden of heavy metals. But although there are numerous anecdotal reports, we have no sound science yet to assess whether, how or in what ways the reduction of those metals leads to an improvement of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. I support such research. Secondarily, like all forms of treatment, chelation can be mishandled by practitioners; it carries some intrinsic risk for which there are protective measures that can be taken (and that need to be studied); mishandling this treatment can create extra risk. I support research to determine if there are optimal chelation strategies that minimize risk and maximize any potential benefit. There is risk for many procedures and medications in medicine, and this is balanced against benefit and need.

            “It is also the case that physicians use treatments based on judgment in cases of serious need. That is commonplace. Obviously there are good and bad doctors but it is not only bad doctors who do whatever they can to help patients in need. Good doctors are often good precisely because they do that skillfully.

            “There are always good doctors, bad doctors, successes, failures and mistakes. That is not a news story. The CENTRAL conclusion to be drawn from observing parents searching far and wide for treatments for their ASD children—and reporting successes as well as failures and catastrophes—is that much more attention must be focused by mainstream medicine and federal and private funding on the medical crisis faced by so many of these children.”

          • Anonymous

            Nowhere in your post is there any evidence that chelation provides any beneficial effects for autistic children.

            There is a reason the overwhelming majority of conventional physicians and medical academics do not recommendation chelation for autistic children. (And no, bizarrely enough it’s not because they are part of a conspiracy to make you and your child suffer). It is dangerous, it is invasive, it is traumatic, and ultimately it is unnecessary. The question isn’t whether Tariq’s death was accidental or not, but whether he should have been subjected to a treatment carrying such risks in the first place.

            In any case, I’m done arguing. I know you won’t be persuaded by anything I’m telling you, no matter how logical, because it conflicts with your personal experience and most deeply held personal beliefs. Therefore even the most objective evidence will almost certainly not sway you. In fact, it will probably just serve to strengthen your original belief, and worse, convince you that science is generally impotent. http://getbetterhealth.com/knowledge-vs-certainty-in-medicine/2010.06.10

        • Anonymous

          This dramatic rise of autism is recent. Maybe we should note that we did have a warning about our toxic environment with the boom in ADHD which also falls on the mild side of the ASD spectrum. The medical response has been to medicate all of these kids.

          They are only recently discovering new treatments for conditions that have been around for decades. It is possible that the next generation will implement a diet and supplements that may not have a “theoretical or medical justification,” but could improve a child’s quality of living.

          I don’t believe in a cure. I believe in strengthening children’s immune system and absorption of minerals so that they may benefit more from therapies and enjoy life more.

          I’m sick of hearing moms having to have a poster child for anything. Your child’s happiness and well being should come first, you can still be proud of your autistic child.

          When was it negative for parents to demand better care from the medical community for any child, whether autistic or not? We should never stop questioning, that is what research is for.

          Reply
    • Anonymous

      And penicillan was just spores on bread till some one worked it into a drug. people need to open their minds and realize doctors are not the know all see all they claim to be . if you have seen her son in the worse part of his autism you would know there was no misdiagnois, and i applaude her for getting out there and working to make her sons life a better life. will what she did work for all autistic children … probably not but good for her for going the extra mile and for using her fame to get the word out there. not to give up that things can get better for your child. to argue over simantics is just hater talk. but opinions are free and everyone has one. but applaude her dont condem her for her efforts to make lives better for autistic children. if cancer patients took control ,did the reserch, 75% would not go though unnessary radiation treatments that distroy thier immune system. always question your doctor. always talk to more than one ,get active that’s all she is saying. has anyone tryed different treatments for their children seriosly? just cause she has don’t hate applaude. and besides dont read or listen if you find it annoying.

      Reply
  5. Janna67

    “Doctors don’t know everything.”

    Neither do ex-Playboy models. And when push comes to shove, you can be damned certain that I’m going to give my doctor a lot more credence than Jenny McCarthy. This woman is dangerous. She behaves like all doctors want to drug & dismiss autistic kids. She never considers the fact that her son might not have actually been autistic, and that food (and other) allergies can wreak havoc on a child.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      Amen. That’s a great comment.

      Reply
      • JMO

        Agreed! Great for whatever she thinks worked for her and her son but she needs to stop putting so many false messages out there as if she knows what she’s talking about. All children are different. I am thinking her kid never had autism but she just thinks he did. And telling people not to vaccinate kids is also crazy. The reason why diseases that killed people are eradicated is because of vaccines. Sure parents don’t vaccinate and when your child is sick or dies from a disease don’t start complaining about how you should of would of could of!!!

        Reply
        • Twyla

          Jenny doesn’t tell people not to vaccinate. I don’t know why when parents tell stories of vaccine injuries, the response is to criticize people who don’t vaccinate. If someone told you they were injured in a car accident, would your response be, “But cars are good. We need to drive cars. Just think how bad off we’d be without cars.”

          Reply
  6. mackenzie

    Jenny blamed vaccines for Evan autism. Then she feed him a gluten free diet and all of a sudden Evan is cured. I doubt Evan even have autism.

    Reply
  7. Ri

    My cousin is autistic, and her parents and sibling struggle every single day dealing with it. I find it repulsive that these magazines give Jenny McCarthy a voice to say that Autism is “curable”. It does an incredible injustice to all the families that struggle day in and day out. No one knows what causes Autism, so Jenny McCarthy stop saying non-facts about what causes it and what cures it!

    Reply
    • Twyla

      Jenny knows much more about autism than most of the condescending snyde supercilious people commenting here — at least those whose comments I’ve read so far. If you don’t agree with what she says and don’t want to try the treatments that she describes, fine. But there are a lot of doctors advocating biomedical treatments for autism, and a whole lot of parents reporting good experiences. Read Dr. Bryan Jepson’s book “Changing the Course of Autism”.

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      Have they tryed anything she says . if they haven’t how can you say it doesnt work, my brother is a functional autistic thanks to her and what she had to say. He is even able to hold a part time job .he might not be cured but he’s 85% more mobile that he was three years ago.and thems the facts.

      Reply
  8. Anonymous

    If any of you that have already commented took the time to read her book you would plainly see that she is not trying to do ANY of what you are accusing her of. You ought to sit down and read about her journey with an open mind. “Autism is a general term used to describe a group of complex developmental brain disorders known as Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD).” How dare any of you sit there and say that what that family went through is not a part of this complex group. Who are you to make that determination? That Evan fell nowhere on that spectrum? Shame on you. If you think that the poisons, including our food supply and vaccines, bieng unleashed on our society have nothing to do with neurological disorders, including autism, you are in a sad place. Hang on…it’s going to be a bumpy ride because it’s only going to get worse.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      The fact is autism cannot be cured. Evan may have had some developmental delays that made it look like he fell on the spectrum. No disorder on the spectrum can be cured.

      The research about gluten and casein free diets is inconclusive. Some individual families have had success with it, then that’s great. However, some families have accidentally malnourished their children by feeding them this way.
      Most scientific communities have agreed that vaccines do not cause autism.

      Shame on you.

      Reply
      • Twyla

        It is not a fact that autism cannot be cured. That is an empty statement devoid of fact and devoid of any citation to back it up. It is a fact that some children have recovered from autism. See my link to the Autism Research Institute site.

        Reply
    • Janna67

      Nobody should question her, or her son’s diagnosis, but she can question EVERY SINGLE authority on the subject?

      Her son may very well fall on the “spectrum” and none of us will ever know what his doctor’s did or said about him. It’s irrelevant, really. Not enough studies have been done to prove that autism isn’t caused by another source (i.e. epidurals? pain killers during labor? anesthesia? environmental toxins? the mother standing on her toes on the 113th day of pregnancy?) The point is….. who knows?!? Not Jenny McCarthy and she is irresponsible for scaring parents and shouting about vaccines.

      Just one question: If a gluten-free diet (among other things, I’m sure) “cured” her son, where are all the other “cured” children?

      Reply
      • Twyla

        Here are some of the other recovered children:
        h t t p : / / w w w . danasview.net/recover.htm
        h t t p : / / w w w .ageofautism.com/2009/04/recovery-story-nathan-warner.html
        h t t p : / / w w w . autism.com/fam_recovery.asp
        h t t p : / / w w w . recoveryvideos.com/

        Reply
    • Ashle

      your so right unless you have seen the struggle so many people need to educate themselves on it..

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      Thank you I love that you said this . I’m the lady with the brother who is way better thanks to what she had to say. you couldnt have said it better.

      Reply
  9. TannersDad Tim Welsh

    Jenny is a hero on a number of fronts. She is not a shooting star, helping answer phones for one night and calling it good, she is in for the long haul. Her family grant program through Generation Resecue is giving families both help and hope. Jenny is not a lone singular uninformed voice. We are legion. Autism Support TannersDad Tim

    Reply
  10. delilah

    If you watched dateline the doctor who found “the link” that caused autism by vaccines young babies. Pay money to the parents of the group he was proven wrong so many times. The board of medication revoked his doctor License he can’t be a doctor in any states. Jenny based her knowledge on this doctor.I’m not going to read a book by some wash out playboy. I think the doctors know more than her.

    Reply
    • TannersDad Tim Welsh

      Delilah your comment is ignorant, factually wrong and incoherent. Your lack of open mind and passion for families is the kind of attitude that will lead to the demise of the human race. Autism Warrior Mothers and Fathers are passionate and vocal because they live it 24/7, not because somebody raised questions in a medical journal. TannersDad Tim

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        It’s sad that you agree with Jenny and this idiotic doctor who has spread the lies about vaccines. Good luck when your children catch a deathly illness because they weren’t vaccinated.

        Reply
        • Twyla

          Actually, Tim’s child was vaccinated, which is why he has autism. It’s so dumb when parents of children who blame vaccines for their children’s autism are told that they should vaccinate their children. They did vaccinate their children. That’s the problem. And I am not anti-vaccine. But I do think that our current program is out of control, and problems are not being addressed. Too many vaccines too soon, and vaccine reactions ignored — not studied, not treated, not even tracked.
          h t t p : / / w w w . cbsnews.com/stories/2008/05/12/cbsnews_investigates/main4086809.shtml

          Reply
    • Twyla

      Actually, Jenny based her knowledge more on Dr. Jerry Kartzinel than on Dr. Andrew Wakefield. And your characterization of Dr. Wakefield is innacurate. See the articles at: h t t p : / / w w w . wesupportandywakefield.com/
      and the interview at: h t t p : / / w w w . youtube.com/watch?v=oIsFW5phHas&feature=player_embedded#

      Reply
  11. TannersDad Tim Welsh

    If you are not willing to read maybe you are capable of watching a video… “@safeminds: On election day – get the Whole Story on vaccines and autism http://conta.cc/cOKdk4 TannersDad Tim Welsh

    Reply
  12. delilah

    Look tanner dad I’m not going to argue with you because it kind of lame to argue with someone on the blog world tanner dad you can read all about DR Andrew Wakefield,

    The doctor who sparked a worldwide panic over the MMR vaccine could be struck off after being found guilty yesterday of a series of misconduct charges related to his “unethical” research.

    Andrew Wakefield, who in 1998 claimed an unfounded link between the vaccination and autism, “showed a callous disregard” for the suffering of children, subjecting them to unnecessary, invasive tests, a hearing found.

    The General Medical Council (GMC) ruled that he abused his position of trust as he researched a possible link between the MMR vaccine, bowel disease and autism in children.

    It found that Wakefield and two colleagues acted dishonestly and irresponsibly in carrying out research on children against their best interests and without official permission.

    The GMC ruled that Wakefield, who was working at the Royal Free Hospital in London as a gastroenterologist at the time, did not have the ethical approval or qualifications to oversee the study, which involved children undergoing colonoscopies, lumbar punctures, barium meals and brain scans.

    He was also found to have brought the medical profession into disrepute after taking blood samples from youngsters at his son’s birthday party in return for payments of £5 and failing to disclose vital conflicts of interest.

    He received £50,000 to carry out the research on behalf of solicitors acting for parents who believed that their children had been harmed by MMR, but could not account for how at least half this money had been spent.

    He also did not declare any conflict of interest to The Lancet medical journal, which published the research.

    The GMC found the charges against Wakefield, and the professors John Walker-Smith and Simon Murch were “sufficient to amount to serious professional misconduct”.

    But as he delivered the verdicts, Dr Surendra Kumar, the panel’s chairman, was repeatedly heckled by distraught parents who support Wakefield and his former colleagues. One woman shouted: “These doctors have not failed our children. You are outrageous.” She called the panel of experts “b******s” and accused the GMC of being a “kangaroo court”. All three doctors deny any wrongdoing.

    The study prompted a massive drop in the number of children being vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella. Uptake of the MMR vaccine was 91 per cent before 1998, but by 2003 this had fallen to 79 per cent. In 2008 there were nearly 1,400 confirmed cases of measles in England and Wales — compared with 57 in 1997 — and nearly a dozen deaths had been officially linked to the illness.

    Subsequent studies involving millions of children found no evidence of a link between MMR and autism.

    The hearing sat for 148 days over a two-and-a-half year period, at a cost to the GMC, funded by doctors, of more than £1 million. It is the longest running medical misconduct case in the Council’s 147 year history.

    Before yesterday’s hearing, 12 organisations, including the Medical Research Council, the British Medical Association and Faculty of Public Health, released a joint statement reaffirming their confidence in the jab.

    “The undersigned believe that the MMR triple vaccine protects the health of children,” they said. “A large body of scientific evidence shows no link between the vaccine and autism.”

    Wakefield was not present to hear the verdicts being read out but appeared to make a statement later, saying he was dismayed at the panel’s decision.

    “I am extremely disappointed by the outcome of today’s proceedings,” he said.

    “The allegations against me and my colleagues are unfounded and unjust and I invite anyone to examine the contents of these proceedings and come to their own conclusions.”

    Reply
    • Twyla

      You’ve got it all wrong, Delilah. See the articles at: h t t p : / / w w w . wesupportandywakefield.com/
      and the interview at: h t t p : / / w w w . youtube.com/watch?v=oIsFW5phHas&feature=player_embedded#
      Also see this movie: h t t p : / / w w w . viddler.com/explore/ziggy/videos/1/
      And h t t p : / / w w w .cryshame.com/

      Delilah, you are completely falling for the mainstream media spin and mainstream medicine’s CYA instead of really understanding the subject matter.

      Reply
  13. Anonymous

    Amen Delilah. I feel really bad for those who believe the crap about vaccines causing autism because they’re believing these RIDICULOUS lies. Absolutely ridiculous. How do you explain kids with autism who have never had vaccines? Or ones that have autism that were never vaccinated. S**t happens people. Your kid is not autistic because of a vaccine, so may as well find something/someone else to blame.

    Reply
    • Twyla

      There is a very simple explanation: Not all autism is caused by vaccines.

      Autism is a broad spectrum defined by behaviors, not by causation/etiology. It’s quite possible that some autism is purely genetic, and that some is caused by environmental factors such as the increasing amount of mercury in our environment.
      h t t p : / / w w w . environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/ocean-mercury-increasing

      Reply
  14. TannersDad Tim Welsh

    I know it is a lot to ask but I highly recommend two books if you really care about this issue… CALLOUS DISREGARD Autism and Vaccines – The Truth Behind the Tragedy by Andrew J. Wakefield and The Age of Autism Mercury Medicine and a Man-Made Epidemic I know 700+ Pages is a lot to read to find out the truth. TannersDad Tim We will never be silent

    Reply
  15. Carl Bainbridge

    i think it is of high importance that you and all those who trash wakefield actually go back and read what you wrote.

    Read again what the complaints were against him

    not one of the complaints was fabricated evidence

    it was all he did not have the right. he did not have the approval. he did not have the authority.

    not one complaint was that he fudged the results.

    he was struck off because of his taking the blood from children at the party not for any faulty research.

    much is made of his being struck off and many attacks on his rights to do what he did but none about his actual research

    that should tell you something.

    oh and the fact that the vast majority of tests to link vaccines and autism that supposedly disprove the results are paid for by the pharmaceutical industry should not factor into our decision either i take it right

    i will not swear that vaccines cause all autism but i do believe it is likely the cause for the dramatic increase in the autism rates

    autism does have an environmental trigger and the coincidence of the majority being the 18th month or approx time of mmr vaccine is to strong to ignore

    Reply
  16. Anne

    I am the sister of an autistic young adult, and whoever says that autism can be cured is insulting my brother, me, my mom, my dad. As for you Jenny McCarthy, go back to what you do best : sell your body.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      Amen! It is absolutely outragous that people actually listen — and take medical advice from!! — this woman. What a (dangerous) joke. And the discredited doctor she supported…well, a quick google of him should tell any reasonable person all they need to know.

      Best to you and your family.

      Reply
    • Twyla

      Anne, why on earth is it an insult to you or your family that some people recover from autism? That is ridiculous. The universe does not revolve around you. Some people do recover from autism. If your sibling has not recovered, that does not make others’ recovery an insult to anyone.

      Reply
  17. Anonymous

    Many people have already posted this, but please, please do not pay any attention to this TannersDad person or anyone else promoting the quack Andrew Wakefield. The ideas they promote are dangerous and harmful. Anyone see all the recent news reports about outbreaks of preventable diseases that kill people? There is ZERO evidence that vaccines cause autism. It has been widely discredited. (And even if they did, I’d rather my child be alive and autistic than dead.)

    Reply
    • Anonymouse

      EXACTLY.

      Parents of autistic children are looking to find something to blame for the autism. While wanting to find a cause and explanation is normal, discouraging people from vaccinating is ludicrous and deadly.

      Tanners dad, just curious, did your wife solely breastfeed your autistic child?

      Reply
      • Twyla

        Parents of autistic children are looking for effective treatments, prevention, and an understanding of the true causes of autism. We are not trying to stop everyone from vaccinating, but the problems with our vaccine program need to be addressed, not swept under the rug.

        My autistic son received a hepatitis B vaccine containing mercury on the day he was born — insane — he was not even at risk for hepatitis B, a newborn’s health status is unknown (allergies? impaired kidney or liver function) and there is no study demonstrating newborns’ tolerance of injected mercury. Hannah Poling received nine vaccines in one day and then regressed into autism. These are examples of the excesses of our vaccine program, where risks and benefit are not reasonably weighed.

        Reply
      • Anonymous

        Are you a parent? Better yet, are you a parent of an autisitc child? Well, I am and I take great offense in the fact that you are so quick to pass judgement on parents of autistic children.

        I just recently read one of Jenny McCarthy’s books (Louder than Words). I read this book with an open mind (& a heavy heart), while still keeping my own beliefs in tact. NOT ONCE did I get the impression that she was trying to encourage parents to not vaccinate their children, nor have I gotten that impression from reading any of the interviews that she’s conducted. She plainly states that she is NOT a doctor, NOR is she anti-vaccine and if any of you would take the time to read some of her literature and learn about what it is exactly she’s trying to do, you would find that she is merely trying to encourage doctors, scientists, parents, etc. to take a closer look at the vaccination schedules for infants & children. Every child is different…..different allergies, different reactions to meds. However, they are all being vaccinated the SAME. THAT is her simple point.

        From what I have read, and I’ll be honest, I haven’t read EVERYTHING on (or written by) Jenny McCarthy, she has never claimed to have CURED Evan, merely reduced his (typical) autistic symptoms to nothing. What parent wouldn’t want to do something like that for their child??

        As I stated, all children are different, therefore her methods of improving her son’s life might not be as effective for other children, but she’s putting that information out there for parents to decide if they want to pursue that course of action and what’s wrong with giving them more options? What’s wrong with possibly giving autistic children the opportunity of a ‘normal’ life??

        True, there is nothing that proves certain vaccinations cause autism. But, it’s also been said that no one knows exactly what triggers it, so how can it be said for a fact that vaccinations DON’T trigger autism in some children?

        Twenty years ago, statistics showed that 1 in 10,000 children were diagnosed as being autistic. Today, it’s 1 in 100. So, before you start personally attacking the parents of autistic children, maybe you should have a little empathy & understanding for those parents that anxiously await for an explanation while trying to provide the best life possible for their special children.

        Reply
  18. Anonymous

    okay, I’m a doctor, and I will say this, if your son “had” autism, then he didn’t have it in the first place! Autism is NOT something that can be cured, if her son was cured, he would be on EVERY, and I mean EVERY single major scientific journal in the world, because lets face it, we all want to cure autism.

    Reply
    • Twyla

      This is one of the really bizarre things about autism today. There are many children who have recovered from autism, but nobody from our government agencies nor mainstream medicine is interested in studying them. I’m not sure what is more bizarre — that vaccine injured children are not being studied (see my link above to the interview with Dr. Bernadine Healey) or that recovered children are not being studied.

      Lyn Redwood’s son recovered from autism with a combination of treatments including detoxification. She thought for sure the government would be interested, but nobody from our government agencies has been interested in studying her son. See her story here:
      h t t p : / / w w w . myfoxatlanta.com/dpp/news/fox-5-special:-autism-treatments-030310
      h t t p : / / w w w . youtube.com/watch?v=XB_1ohubNMI

      Reply
  19. Anonymous

    this woman should be at least sued for being dangerous and giving people false hopes!!! it’s not about autism, it’s about herself.

    Reply
  20. Anonymous

    Her son was diagnosed by an actual doctor as having autism and I think that is correct based on the symptoms she described. Where I think she is wrong is when she says he is cured. I think that is just flat out denial.

    Some children with autism do progress with the right therapy to a point where they can do things that many people do. They aren’t cured, but that’s not easy to see by an outside person.

    I think her son has probably done well with all the therapy he’s had. Maybe she just refuses to see he’s not completely cured of it though?

    Reply
    • Twyla

      I have seen before and after videos of him. He was formerly withdrawn and nonverbal. He is now sociable and talkative. I’m sure he’s not perfect, and I don’t think even she says “cured” but rather “recovered”. But there is a huge difference between being profoundly autistic and being able to converse, socialize, and do the normal activities of daily life.

      Reply
  21. Shirilicious

    You just can’t argue with stupid people.

    Reply
  22. Just so you know

    Jenny son had Landau-Kleffner syndrome which has symptoms of Autism so yes you can be cured of that with right medicine in short amount of time!

    An Autistic child can recover with Bio-Med, HBOT and other treatments but it will take longer!

    Reply
  23. Heredia

    Jenny McCarthy’s son Evan was never autistic so why on earth would anyone assume he was “cure of autism.”????????????????????????

    Reply
    • Twyla

      Actually, he was autistic. Diagnosed by a prominent professional.

      Reply
      • Heredia

        oh pleeeezee. a “prominent professional” OKAY, it’s clear you are one of those types who thinks just because someone is a “PROFESSIONAL” that makes them infallible. Or not easily manipulated by a shady greedy sociopathic actress name Jenny McCarthy.

        Reply
  24. Heredia

    Jenny McCarthy is a liar. She knows her son never had real autism, but doesn’t give a damn, because she sold books. Has anyone noticed how QUICKLY she wrote the books after such a SHORT time of dealing with her son’s alleged autism? Yep, then, as if it were just a passing thing, she jumped on the media bandwagon, hit the talk shows and did more press conferences and then, whaddayaknow, she wrote another book, this time with a nice looking doctor on cover to make it all look official. Wow, amazing how even the professionals sell their souls for money when they know what they’re selling is a buncha half truths and lies. McCarthy should be arrested for impersonating a mother of an autistic child. She should be charged with fraud and recklessly misrepresenting a serious disorder like autism. Her son had febrile seizures. He regressed and displayed temporary autistic like behavior, as is COMMON with children who have Landau Kleffner Syndrome or other disorders that cause cognitive delays. He recovered after he was given seizure medication. NOT from her stupid diet. She’s a damn fool and a liar and is well known throughout autism community as being one of the biggest frauds ever to infiltrate the autism community. ANd shame on the stupid media for NOT exposing her more often or even doing basic research into her claims of curing her son from autism. Her books are VAGUE. And she used other people’s real stories to cover up her fake story. Never have we seen such a selfish, narcisstic manipulative celebrity than Jenny McCarthy. She could care less about the damage she’s done to thousands of families raising autistic children. She could care less about the false images she’s shown on autism. She hides behind the few real stories she infused in her books and while she talks as a very clever and maniuplative way to hide her LIES about her own child. Her child was never autistic and many, many people know this, including professionals. The professional who diagnosed her child should have his licenses revoked. He’s an idiot. Or worse, he profits off that false diagnosis. Gee Jenny, how much MONEY have you made off your fake story of your son with autism? How sad you’d use him like this. All for your glory, as if you could cure autism JEnny, really? Oh, stop the world, Jenny Mccarthy cured autism. Oh please, is she on medical marijuana? Or just evil?

    Reply
  25. Twyla

    These parents had hope, and their hopes were not false:

    h t t p : / / w w w . delcotimes.com/articles/2010/11/29/news/doc4cf32213b3504532381215.txt?viewmode=fullstory

    h t t p : / / w w w . ageofautism.com/2010/12/becky-estepp-talks-about-autism-recovery-there-is-always-hope.html

    Reply
  26. Twyla

    More recovery stories:
    h t t p : / / w w w . epidemicanswers.org/get-help/test-page/autism/

    Reply
  27. Twyla

    Another recovery story:

    h t t p : / / w w w . huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/autism-research-discovery_b_794967.html

    Reply
  28. treatment

    I’m glad that I’ve found this celebritybabyscoop.com web site. What a cool blog! I admire how detailed each of the entries are. They are well balanced – fun and informative – and the pictures are cool too.

    Reply
  29. Krissi

    I agree that Jenny wanted attention. I’m suprised that she went with vaccines as the cause since having a “crystal” child is more Hollywood then vaccines, but then again vaccines are more controversial when involved with autism. There is no ‘cure’, either you conform your child to “fit in” or accept them for the gift they are.

    Reply
  30. Twyla

    Thanks, Lisa!

    Reply
  31. Twyla

    Too bad Lisa Jo’s comment disappeared. Curiouser and curiouser.

    Reply

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