Christina Applegate On Her “Profound” 18 Hour Labor

Christina Applegate On Her "Profound" 18 Hour Labor

In an interview with Ellen DeGeneres airing today (February 22), actress Christina Applegate details the “profound pain” she experienced during her 18 hour labor, and the emotional moment with her daughter, Sadie Grace, now 3-weeks-old, that she says is the best thing that ever happened to her.

Having undergone a double mastectomy in the summer of 2008 after receiving a breast cancer diagnosis, Applegate is no stranger to pain. But the Hall Pass star tells DeGeneres that for her, an epidural was not the answer.

“I didn’t like it,” the 39-year-old actress explains. “I didn’t like the feeling of numbness….It was really creepy to me. It was too much, so we turned it off and we opted to go all the way…Feeling it all.”

After 18 long hours, little Sadie finally arrived, weighing 7 lbs., 8 oz., and at that moment, Applegate says that she surprised herself.

I dropped my gown, which I don’t do,” she reveals. “This part of my body is very private to me. That’s a real private place. A place that I don’t have a good relationship with, let’s say.

“But at that moment of pulling [Sadie] out and I just tore that thing off. There’s a room full of people that I don’t know. Nurses and doctors. And she and I just laid there,” Christina says. “It was the best thing that’s ever happened to me.”

Filed under: Births,Celebrity Moms,Christina Applegate

Photo credit: The Ellen DeGeneres Show

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  1. Tara

    Christina you inspire me. I had the reverse of your situation. I gave birth to my son and then had a double mastectomy 6 months later. To be honest I am not sure I could have had the courage to give birth had I been diagnosed prior to getting pregnant. I think your courage to continue your life is admirable.

    Two years later and my son’s love is the best tonic I ever had. Wish we could bottle up the strength our kids give us and use it for a lifetime.

    Congrats

    Reply
  2. Anonymous

    Tara, you are an inspiration. Congrats to YOU for making it and best wishes for a long, happy future.

    Reply
    • Tara

      Oh my goodness, that is so kind of you to say. Like I said I am very fortunate and am surrounded by a lot of love and blessings.

      To anyone that is faced with this daunting diagnosis, all I can tell you is that while it is indeed a rough road but with so many advances today the survival rate is extremely high. I am in my early 30s and am look forward to watching my beautiful boy experience everything this great world has to offer.

      Sorry if I come off corny, today I had a clean bill of health at the docs so am a tad euphoric;)

      Reply
  3. umi

    “I didn’t like it,” the 39-year-old actress explains. “I didn’t like the feeling of numbness….It was really creepy to me.

    Reply
  4. Audrey

    I understand CA too. Having had a bilateral mastectomy in 2000 my chest doesn’t seem to be mine anymore. But even after two reconstruction events when my grandchildren began coming, the mastectomy became nominal in my life.

    Reply
  5. Janelle

    Not to be rude here, but is it not on the selfish side having a child when you had cancer prior? You are taking a chance on that kid being motherless in the future.

    Tara I think it’s admirable, but you must have been told it could be possible since it occurred so closely after the birth of your son, surely your doctors knew ahead of time and informed you?

    Reply
    • Lucy

      You may not have intended to be rude, but you are. No one has the right to tell anyone what they can and cannot do with regard to pregnancy. Does Christina not deserve a chance to be happy and experience what is her right simply because she was one of the unlucky ones?

      And Tara you are way too understanding- I would have been much less diplomatic with my response to janelle. also your husband is an a**, I had a friend who had the same thing happen to her, but she was much older than you and did not have any young children to worry about.

      God bless

      Reply
      • Janelle

        Think what you want. As was stated I have a right to my opinion. And she reinforced my point by saying he mom died of the disease when she was a teen. She knew she had the chance of getting it, genetic test results or not.

        I wish her well, but wonder who will be responsible for her son, if the cancer returns. Call me whatever you want, I know I would never have risked it, if one of my parents had a history.

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          Guess what? No one is guaranteed to make it to the next day. Anyone could be diagnosed with cancer. You could step into the street tomorrow and get hit by a bus. There are risks in every single thing you do (and if you deny that, you are either a moron or a liar). Does that mean we should all refrain from having children?

          Reply
        • Janique

          You must live quite a sheltered lifestyle if you’re always worried about every little risk. There is a chance anyone could develop caner, there is a chance you could die of anything, there’s also the chance that your kids could turn out rotten even if you are there to be a mother to them. None of this stops people from getting on with their lives and having kids, and it shouldn’t.

          Reply
    • Audrey

      You risk leaving a child motherless anytime you ride in a car, cross a street, or any of a dozen things. It would be sadder to live life waiting for the horrors that may not happen, than stepping out in faith and just live.

      Reply
    • abby

      anyone having a kid is taking a chance on that kid being motherless in the future. we could be hit by a bus tomorrow. if you knew anything about the statistics of disease recurrence you would not come off sounding so ignorant. to answer your question: NO, it is not selfish to have a child when you have a personal history of cancer.

      Reply
  6. Tara

    Ladies- thanks again for your nice comments. I do not want to hijack this thread as it’s not about me but christina, but…

    Audrey- sounds like you have been through the wars. I wish you well.

    Janelle- your point is valid. I think each situation is different. I can only speak for myself. I did not know that I would get cancer within a year of giving of birth. I would not have taken the chance but that is me. My mom died of BC when I was a teen, so I took the genetic testing. It came out that I did not carry the gene. If it came back positive i perhaps would never have had mys son, for the same reason you state.Of course it’s always in the back of your mind, but it’s
    not good to live your life in fear. One could be perfectly healthy and end up dying in an auto accident. There are no guarantees.

    As far as I knew my chance of getting sick was as good as anyone elses. You cannot predict the future. Using this same logic, knowing my husband would leave me after I had the mastectomy, would I have married him? No I would not. But taking all these factors into consideration, would I change a thing that happened? Absolutely not. My son is my greatest blessing and I can only pray that God has a different plan for me and that it includes me being on this earth for many years to come.

    Warm wishes to all.

    Reply
    • Tara

      One final point…I promise,

      Who knows maybe I gave birth (or any of these ladies on the board) to the one person who may find a cure for this disease, so that no one will ever again lose their mom, grandmother, sister or aunt. However if he ends up simply living a humble ,good ,decent and honorable life I will still maintain the risk taken was
      worth it.

      Reply
      • Moo x

        I totally agree with Janna, you don’t need to explain anything to anyone Tana – anybody should be able to have a child, things that *may* happen in future shouldn’t have an effect on how you do/don’t live your life.

        Also, you seem very well adjusted and like you are a wonderful mum, and have dealt with the blows life has sent your way admirably. I love the above response, best one i have seen on this site so far!

        Best wishes to you and your family
        xx

        Reply
      • Moo x

        I totally agree with Janna, you don’t need to explain anything to anyone Tana – anybody should be able to have a child, things that *may* happen in future shouldn’t have an effect on how you do/don’t live your life.

        Also, you seem very well adjusted and like you are a wonderful mum, and have dealt with the blows life has sent your way admirably. I love the above response, best one i have seen on this site so far!

        Best wishes to you and your family
        xx

        Reply
        • Moo x

          I am so sorry Tara, i just realised this whole time i’ve been writing your name as Tana…my bad :-(
          I’m not usually illiterate, honest, lol x

          Reply
          • Tara

            Don’t worry at all- I have been called much worse, believe me;)

            Ironically enough as a kid I could not pronounce the letter “r”, plus I had a stutter, so whenever anyone asked my name it came out T-t-t-t-ana!

            Thanks again for your sweet words. Btw I notice you said “mum”. I worked in London for 8 years and thought that was much cuter than our “mom”

          • Moo x

            Lol, yeah i’m just outside London! I’ve got to admit, i am partial to ‘mum’ opposed to ‘mom’, though i’ve grown up with it so that’s not surprising!

            Haha, that really is quite ironic, though i usually pay more attention before i hit send, clearly wasn’t paying attention the other day! whoops :-)

  7. Janna

    Tara:

    You have no need to explain why you chose to have a child and I’m a little mortified that anyone would even ask that, but your explanation that you may have given birth to the person who finds a cure for the disease was a perfect response!

    Stay strong, love your baby… NONE OF US knows how long we’ve got left.

    Reply
    • Tara

      No worries. Everyone has a right to their opinion. Janelle was just stating her beliefs. Life is too short to sweat the small stuff. Enjoy every minute. Off to hug my bubba;)

      Reply
  8. Anonymous

    Regarding not having a child because of the risk of not being around: I was 3 months old when my mother was diagnosed with cancer and she died 9 months later. Do I wish I’d never been born because I had to grow up not knowing her? Of course not.

    Reply
  9. Pingback: Happy 3rd Birthday Sadie LeNoble! | Celebrity Baby Scoop

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