Amanda Peet: I’m “Committed To Reducing Measles Deaths Globally”

Amanda Peet: I'm "Committed To Reducing Measles Deaths Globally"

Something’s Gotta Give star Amanda Peet is one of our favorite celeb moms! The actress joined the American Red Cross on Monday to thank a group of students in New York for helping to vaccinate two villages against measles. Amanda – mom to daughters Frankie, 4, Molly, 1 – has long been outspoken on the topic of childhood vaccinations.

The champion for childhood immunizations tells Celebrity Baby Scoop “every day, 450 children in this world die from measles – a disease that is entirely preventable with a vaccine.” Amanda goes on to talk about the Measles Initiative and how she’s “committed to reducing measles deaths globally.”

CBS: Tell us about partnering with the Red Cross Measles Initiative at Nest +m school in New York.

AP: “I joined the American Red Cross on Monday, May 9, 2011 in surprising a group of 500 students at Nest+m school in New York City. I wanted to celebrate the students’ work toward vaccinating two villages of children against one of the most contagious and deadly diseases – measles.

Throughout the month, the Nest+m school will host a series of competitions and other activities to help students raise enough money to vaccinate their third village. During the rally, I presented the school’s Red Cross club with the “Measles Initiative Advocates of the Month” honor for their dedication to the cause year round. Before leaving, I also read It Couldn’t Be the Measles – a rhyming story about a spotted elephant by Brian D. Hahn – to a Kindergarten class. It was especially heart-warming to listen to how the younger students – my daughter’s age – planned to help reduce the health challenges families in Africa and Asia face every day.”

CBS: Why is this cause so important to you?

AP: “Every day, 450 children in this world die from measles – a disease that is entirely preventable with a vaccine. We have an actual cure, yet innocent children are still dying at alarming numbers.

Why? I learned why… The measles vaccine may exist, but many parents and children in this world do not have access to that cure. They live in remote villages, in countries with weak and inadequate health care systems. Routine immunization is a foreign concept altogether.

Can you imagine watching your child die from a disease that a simple vaccine could have cured? It is not right. We take so much for granted in this country. When my children were born, my husband and I made the choice to vaccinate them against measles. Why shouldn’t other parents have that same choice and that same peace of mind? Why shouldn’t those children be protected the way mine are?

The good news is that groups like the American Red Cross and the United Nations joined together in 2001 and formulated a plan to bring mass measles vaccination campaigns to countries and villages all over the world. For two years, I have been a volunteer with the American Red Cross, advocating on behalf of its Measles Initiative, a partnership committed to reducing measles deaths globally.”

CBS: Are other schools around the country implementing similar initiatives?

AP: “Nest+m school is just one example of how young people are making a difference. The desire from New York teens to help save children and protect entire villages half a world a way is also evident in other cities, including San Diego, Chicago and Houston. This is a generous generation, willing to take the change out of their pocket and change a child’s future.”

CBS: How can the rest of us support the Red Cross in this effort?

AP: “Before the American Red Cross and its partners formed the Measles Initiative in 2001, more than 750,000 children worldwide died from measles each year. While the global health partnership has made significant progress in the last decade, measles still kills an estimated 164,000 people annually.

For less than $1, a child can be vaccinated and the Measles Initiative can continue to drive that number down. With help from your friends, family, coworkers or classmates, anyone can easily vaccinate an entire village and put an end to this fight. Text PREVENT to 90999 to give $10 to the American Red Cross. This simple gesture will protect 10 children for a lifetime. Visit measlesinitiative.org to learn more.”

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Filed under: Amanda Peet,Celebrity Interview,Exclusives

Photo credit: Roberta Lichtman/American Red Cross

13 Comments »»

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  1. SMH

    and those who do have access to the vaccine and refuse to vaccinate their children should be ashamed!! I’d much rather risk other kind of things happening to my child (i.e. autism – even though it’s yet to be proven) then have my child die of something I could of prevented. To vaccinate and not to vaccinate is a heated debate everywhere but really there is no excuse imo.

    Reply
  2. Jul

    Please do your research and don’t just vaccinate because your pediatrician says so. THAT is ignorant. The facts are
    -Dangers of childhood diseases are greatly exaggerated in order to scare parents into compliance with a questionable but highly profitable procedure.
    -The long term adverse effects of vaccinations have been ignored in spite of compelling correlations with many serious chronic conditions. Doctors can’t explain the dramatic rise in many of these diseases.
    -The vast majority of the time, childhood infectious diseases are benign and self-limiting. They usually impart lifelong immunity, whereas vaccine-induced immunity is only temporary. In fact, the temporary nature of vaccine immunity can create a more dangerous situation in a child’s future.
    - Read the inserts before you let anybody inject your child. Do you know what is in those vaccinations, really? What if your child gets a “bad batch”? Any time your child is injected with a vaccine YOU are putting them at risk.

    Reply
    • Anonymommy

      How many children die from simple childhood diseases such as chicken pox, measles and mumps since the vaccinations started? Less than 1% since their inception. How many cases of autism have been misdiagnosed as a result of vaccines from 2008-2010? In the US alone 32,450 cases were proven to be discounted.

      Sorry the odds favor the vaccines. Throw out all your fear mongering the majority of the people vaccinate and those who don’t are nothing more than criminals for endangering the spread of these diseases.

      Reply
    • Daniella

      Jul, have you ever taken a look at the death rates among infants & toddlers prior to 20th century & advent of vaccinations? The rate at which childhood diseases (measles, rubella, smallpox, polio, diphtheria, meningitis, mumps, pneumonia, etc.) used to kill children under the age of 10 were extremely high, at times killing half of the children in a family. Couples often had 10 or more children, but only half of those children survived to see their teenage years due to these (now preventable) diseases.

      And that whole belief that people only lived to be 40 years old & then died is a load of rubbish. The high rates amongst young children completely skewed the statistics & brought down the life expectancy rate. If you made it through early & mid-childhood, then you’d likely live to a pretty good age most of the time (except for women, childbirth was terrible & killed many women back then).

      You can argue all you want about how “bad” vaccines are, but almost any scientist or historian will laugh in your face if you try to tell them that the invention of vaccines has not saved BILLIONS of children’s lives. Mothers in many African nations still live through the horror of watching their children die from these entirely preventable diseases while the rest of the world has forgotten how terrible smallpox, polio, diphtheria, etc. can truly be.

      Reply
  3. alaina

    Totally agreed with smh.

    Reply
  4. Anonymous

    Jul, please do your research. Check the rates of simple, PREVENTABLE childhood illnesses and their mortality rates in the United States. Check the rates from the 1950s and then compare with mortality rates from 2010. Deaths of those illnesses in the U.S. have almost dropped off the map, BECAUSE OF VACCINES.

    But people still refuse to believe it. Doctors and nurses are once again having to watch children die or live with permanent disabilities because of illnesses like measles, chicken pox, and whooping cough, because their parents ignore basic facts and refuse to vaccinate.

    Just because an internet page looks official and offers a lot of information as “facts” doesn’t make it so. Your doctor has NOTHING to gain by lying to you.

    Vaccines work. And that is fact.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    I used to think my two oldest sons developed autism because of the vaccinations and I didn’t have my youngest son vaccinated until he was two. He is healthy. Now I read that vaccines can’t be the cause and the other other thing I did different with baby number three was to not breastfeed which leads to wonder if there’s a link. Did I pass something to my oldest children? Can bfing be dangerous? I wasn’t bf nor my brother. My oldest two were and they have autism. If it’s not vaccines and I don’t buy that my third son got lucky then I’m not bfing in the future to be safe.

    BTW, my third son never got any of those infection diseases even though he wasn’t vaccinated until two.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      Were you on any medication while breastfeeding? I can’t imagine breastfeeding itself could any injury to a child, but some medication taken by the mother could harm the baby.

      I have a friend with an autistic child. She breastfeed but was also on medicine at the time.

      Reply
  6. Mia

    Jul is not wrong. Actually, she is right. 450 Children dying of Measles? I bet there are at least as many children dying or disabled as a result from vaccinations. I know one child that died and two disabled ones, approved vaccination damage. But I know not a single child who had a children’s disease and suffered long-term damage.

    I am not a vaccination opposer, but I demand everyone to handle this topic questioning.

    Reply
  7. Anonymous

    as someone who works in the public health field and is trained in infectious diseases, it amazes me to listen to people argue against vaccinating children due to the supposed autism link. the gentlemen who “proved” this was discredited, his licence was also suspended, the journals that published his work were heavily fined or discredited, and he is a standing joke in the infectious disease community. His test subjects were children at his child’s bday party, and this “research” was done without parental consent as to what the information they give him was going to be used for. His research was done one time on a very small group of children. Hardly scientific!
    Good for Amamda Peet for standing up for vaccines! One thing to consider is that many people do not vaccinate because it is the “hip” thing to do. I wonder how many of these people who do not vaccinate have gone to third world countries and sat with a dying child who has no chance for a vaccine? I also wonder if they understand the enormity if everyone stopped vaccinating. Our generation(I am 30) is not afraid of these diseases because we have been fortunate and not had to watch classmates die of measles, mump, rubella,whooping cough, polio, etc…. due to the vaccination of generations before us and our generation as well. I am sure if the child of someone who does not vaccinate was to contract one of these terrible diseases, they would change their mind.

    Reply
  8. Emmy's Mom

    Unfortunately, I have personal experience with what can happen when a child doesn’t get a timely measles vaccine. Again I say, a “timely” vaccine.
    My husband and I lost our beautiful daughter who we adopted from an orphanage in Pune, India in 2005 on January 2, 2011. She died from s.S.P.E. Subacute Sclerosing Pan Enephalitis, a fatal complication of the measles in a child that contracted measles before they received their vaccine. Any person considering international adoption needs to e aware of whether their child had measles in their native country or if they received a measles vaccine and when they received that vaccine. S.S.P.E. is fatal. Period. No cure. Poor treatment prognosis for any extended life. My daughter was diagnosed 8/18/10 and died 1/2/11. Think about it. When you choose not to vaccinate, this could be your child. Granted, children in orphanages tend to be sickly due to dirty water and poor nutrition. However, any child could have an undiagnosed medical condition that could be worsened by the measles. You endanger your whole communit when you don’t vaccinate. You have many personal rights. Making other people sick in our society is not one of them.The report by Andrew Wakefield(Ican’t call him “Dr.”) was false. he was paid by a firm who wanted to sue vaccine manufacturers so he produced a false report and got paid for it. You wouldn’t neglect your childs physical development, think swimming, gymnastics, karate, you need to consider their overall health and protect them from all chance of dying needlessly. Be responsible. WE NEED COMMUNITY IMMUNITY!!!

    Reply

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