Gwyneth Paltrow Inspired To Raise Her Kids In The Jewish Faith

Gwyneth Paltrow Inspired To Raise Her Kids In The Jewish Faith

Is Gwyneth Paltrow planning to raise her children in the Jewish faith?

Since finding out her family comes from a long line of East European rabbis in the show Who Do You Think You Are?, the actress, who has children, Apple, 7, and Moses, 5, with husband Chris Martin, might change her approach to parenting.

The Daily Mail reports Paltrow was in London speaking in front of guests of Jewish charity the Community Security Trust when she talked about being inspired to teach her children more about the faith.

The British newspaper added the thoughts of a geneaology expert. He says since religion passes through the matriarchal line, Gwyneth and her children could not be considered true Jews because even though her father was Jewish, her mother Blythe Danner is a Christian.

He said, “Miss Paltrow may just want to follow traditions that she did as a child, like observing the Sabbath, keeping a kosher home and celebrating holidays.”

Filed under: Gwyneth Paltrow

Photo credit: Fame

13 Comments »»

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  1. Anonymous

    Ugh, barf.

    Shouldn’t she have decided how she was going to raise her children a long time ago? I mean, they’re 5 and 7 already! Besides, if faith (of any kind) was actually important to her, she would have done it regardless of whether or not she came from a “long line of famous rabbis”…seriously, this is just so stupid and vapid.

    Reply
  2. Anonymous

    A lesson for this blog – you really should not put so much trust in articles from The Daily Fail. Gwyneth did not just find out her father came from a long line of Rabbis from that show. She has always known that (if *I* knew that years ago, it obviously came from her). She may have learned new facts about it, but not the basic details as presented in the linked article and the post here.

    And I don’t know why they would consult a “geneaology” expert to talk about a religious belief. The Jewish belief that the religion passes through the mother’s side is a religious belief, not a genetic property. Religion isn’t genetic. And in any case, not all Jews follow that outdated belief any more. Many Reform Jews only require one Jewish parent, mother or father, and that anyone who follows the religion and believes themselves to be Jewish is Jewish.

    Reply
    • Auntie

      Anon, you are right. THis site (CBB) is an American site and the Daily Mail is just barely a step above the Sun or the Enquirer. Accuracy/research is not tops on their agenda-ever.

      Reply
  3. Anonymous

    And in any case, not all Jews follow that outdated belief any more. Many Reform Jews only require one Jewish parent, mother or father, and that anyone who follows the religion and believes themselves to be Jewish is Jewish.
    Where are you getting this from? Definitely not from the Jewish Torah. If I believe I’m Queen of Sheba, it does not make it so. Every religion has its rules and laws. In Judaism, a child takes on the faith of its mother. In islam, a child takes on the faith of the father – thus obama was born muslim. If you want to convert to Judaism or islam, there are procedures. You can’t just wake up tomorrow and declare yourself a Jew or muslim. In Catholicism it is the pope who decides matters of faith and not some self-anointed, radical excommunicated fallen Catholic. You may agree or disagree with any religion, you may practice it however you wish, but that does not give you the authority to officially change the religion just because you want to.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      Where am I getting it from? Um, maybe from the fact that I am a Reform Jew?

      Reply
    • L.A.

      last time I checked Religion was a matter of Faith, not nationalities (jews are originally from Eastern Europe and North Africa..) nor genetics. As you said each religion as its history and laws (even inside each religion got different level of practice). And we all know why in Judaism, the child takes its mother faith, jews being really down to earth stuck to the “We always know who the mother is, can’t say the same about the father”, so to grow a stronger sense of community, the decision for the child to take his mother faith was made.
      For Islam, matters inside the house go to the women, outside to the men, so religion is link to the men, father. Could have been the other way around for both religions.
      The bottom line is, Obama is not born muslim, he could have been muslim without the need to convert if he chose to be…. You can’t be forced to be, or believe, otherwise your Faith is fake, and you’re just a shame to the religion you pretend to belong. (how many “born muslim, so muslim I am” I see drinking alcohol! and I could find examples in every religion)

      Reply
    • DB

      Um, how did Obama become part of this conversation? And why are uninformed people always trying to label him a Muslim? The man was raised by his mother as a Christian.

      Reply
  4. Noa

    “Where are you getting this from? Definitely not from the Jewish Torah. If I believe I’m Queen of Sheba, it does not make it so. Every religion has its rules and laws. In Judaism, a child takes on the faith of its mother.”

    Exactly and calling the law “outdated” is an insult for all those that DO still practice the religion in an observant manner without being considered “backwards”. Now if you knew the history of reform and how they came about, it had nothing to do with “modernism” and A LOT to do with the influence of Luther in Germany.

    Reply
  5. Noa

    I would also like to add that not all jews are of european jewish ancestry nor was or is their judaism affected by the german movement of reform that spread to the US.
    So for the rest of us sephardim, you still have to be born to a jewish mother and or have a valid conversion to be considered jewish. I guess that makes us unmodern.

    Reply
  6. Anonymous

    I guess the 2-year RCIA class I’m taking to become a Catholic is old-fashioned and unmodern, too, then. Gosh, it’d be so much easier if I could just say “I believe I’m Catholic, so therefore, I’m Catholic.” But it’s not about being easy. Committing yourself to a faith, whether Christian, Jewish, or Islam, requires a lot of soul-searching and willingness to adhere to the guidelines of that faith. It’s wonderful, and because it’s so profound, you’ve got to kind of work for it, you know?

    Reply
  7. Anonymous

    I just think it’s funny you picked a picture where Gwynnie is hanging out with Jews (Steven Spielberg.)

    Reply
  8. Melissee

    I’m not sure why everyone is making such a big deal about this. Honestly, I think the first comment by Anonymous, when she refers Jewish law being “outdated” is true for many Reform Jews. Maybe “outdated” wasn’t the right term, but the truth of the matter is, in many religions, there are things that modern people have come to decide for themselves may not be relevant or adaptable to the times we live in (ex. some religions and countries don’t allow for women to have equal rights). Just like with a lot of things, people pick and chose what works for them and go with it. It’s called “evolution”. Isn’t the whole point to just believe in something? My best friend is a half-Mexican Jew (on her father’s side, mother converted) who’s married to a Chinese man. She intends on raising their kids as Jews (Reform). Why do we criticize Gwyneth or anyone else for doing what they feel is right for themselves and their families? Get it together people.

    Reply

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