Colin Farrell Explains Son’s Diagnosis Of Angelman Syndrome

Colin Farrell Explains Son's Diagnosis Of Angelman Syndrome

Colin Farrell recently opened up on the Late Show With David Letterman and gave a shout out to James, his 7-year-old son with ex-girlfriend Kim Bordenave.

He said, “James, just a quick shout out if I can, James has a condition called Angelman Syndrome and it only affects one in 30,000 children, they say. So there’s not that much funding because it doesn’t benefit pharmaceutical companies, of course.”

He added that James is “pretty high-functioning and is a very, very happy boy.”

The actor also asked for people to visit CureAngelman.org and to help donate. When asked how his son was diagnosed, he replied that “a doctor saw how happy he was.”

He explained, “He was like, ‘Does he always smile this much?’”

Frequent smiling is a trait of Angelman Syndrome.

Farrell also has another son named Henry, 1 1/2, with Alicja Bachleda.

Filed under: Colin Farrell

Photo credit: Flynet

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  1. nosoupforyou

    I have two clients with Angelman Syndrome on my caseload. Angleman Syndrome is caused by a deletion or inactivation of genes on the maternally inherited chromosome 15. Drug companies cannot cure it.

    However, perhaps he was speaking about seizures. Both of my client’s seizures are controlled completely by medication.

    One needs to take metabolic supplements as well.

    Reply
    • believe

      to: nosoupforyo.. You talk about caseload. Therefore, I imagine you work for a state agency. The tone in your writing is very negative. I imagine you do not have any children of your own with special needs or physically challenged. Families with special people have one thing and that is hope to get through the day. It appears you do not to give any of that! I personally would not want you as my case worker.

      In fact, I am not sure if you are qualified to give a definition of of angelmans syndrom. Angelman syndrome is caused by the loss of the normal maternal contribution to a region of chromosome 15, most commonly by deletion of a segment of that chromosome.

      Other causes include uniparental disomy, translocation, or single gene mutation in that region. I don not read maternally inherited chromosome 15 …thus, it maybe one caused…. but not the only cause.

      I am very proud of ColIn Ferrel and it takes strength to do what he is doing!

      Reply
  2. Anon

    He is very educated about his son’s condition and, like many families of patient’s who suffer from incurable but manageable conditions, knows firsthand how frustrating it is when “big business drug companies” determines how patients like his son are treated. Or not treated.

    He is correct. Its all about the money, not about the people in need.

    He really seems to be a great dad. Well done, Colin.

    Reply
  3. Rachel

    I couldn’t agree more with the above post, very well stated.

    Well done for Colin, it’s amazing to see how fatherhood has changed him.

    Reply
  4. Karina Mom to an Angel

    There has been a cure found for Angelman syndrome. It has been cured in the mouse model by Dr. Weber. The Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics is trying to get it to clinical trials….all they need is the cash. I want to thank Colin for educating the public about this rare syndrome that my beautiful 11 year old Daughter also has. It is so rare most doctors have never heard of it.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    Rare diseases are actually highly lucrative for pharma companies. There are major incentives to develop and market them, including lengthy exclusivity periods and premium pricing, so believe me the rareness of the disease if anything would spur pharma company research, it would not be the reason it’s ignored.

    Reply
  6. Sarah M.

    I’ve met a very sweet boy with this disorder. The first thing I noticed about him was that he was ALWAYS smiling and ready with a hug. I found out after a bit that he has Angelman’s. He stayed home with dad and both of his parents and older sister were VERY knowledgeable about the condition and do an event to raise money for the research and cure for it. They are truly an amazing family to know!

    As this is something that a lot of people don’t know much about, it’s great that Colin is speaking out about it!!

    Reply
  7. shannon

    i thank him for that as well. ive just been recently informed due to my baby having angelmans syndrome and i am not that knowledgable about it yet and im scared, i dont know what to do i just keep blaming myself. but, shes beautiful and happy and thats all that should matter.

    Reply
  8. Karen

    As amazing as it may sound my son is 33 and was diagnosed 3 years ago. We were so sure for about 20 years but the testing wasn’t as good as it is now. It’s been a bumpy ride but our son is the light of our lives. I worry what will happen when we are no longer able to care for him. It surprizes me that most people in the medical commutity have never heard of it. I usually have to explain it to them.

    Reply
  9. Anonymous

    There isn’t a cure for a genetic disorder. My son has Angleman Syndrome and we are in a critical situation. I need to contact Colin Ferrel if it is possible. I have been a part of the Angelman Syndrome Foundation for 13 years, and my situation need national attention at this point. Any help would be appreciated. dolena_hawaii@yahoo.com

    Reply
  10. Molly Browne

    I think that it is awsome that you are so committed to your children. My son had many complications when he was born. But regardless of what the doctor’s said he’s doing great. It was very hard in the beginning but he as pulled through great. My son is my hero.

    Reply
  11. Molly Browne

    I think that it is awsome that you are so committed to your children. My son had many complications when he was born. But regardless of what the doctor’s said he’s doing great. It was very hard in the beginning but he as pulled through great. My son is my hero.

    Reply
  12. Molly Browne

    I think that it is awsome that you are so committed to your children. My son had many complications when he was born. But regardless of what the doctor’s said he’s doing great. It was very hard in the beginning but he as pulled through great. My son is my hero.

    Reply
  13. Anonymous

    God bless Colin for being proud of his son and bringing awareness to this rare genetic disorder. It’s a shame Jenny McCarthy isn’t bringing awareness to her son’s real diagnosis, Laundau Kleffner Syndrome, because a lot of families would be happy if she did. Her son isn’t autistic.

    Reply
  14. Annie Purinton

    One of my very best friends has a son with Angelman’s Syndrome. Just as was described above, he is the happiest boy. Unfortunately, those children born with Angelman’s Syndrome grow up to be full size adults, but they stay innocent with no fear of anything (electricity, glass from a broken frame, traffic, getting lost, their own strength and on and on.) Think of your 18 year child with a brain that stays the age of of an infant to a preschooler. You worry about them at all times. This syndrome needs to be researched and understood. These children are precious, happy but there is not a lot of knowledge in the medical community on how to help them. My friend has had to fight for any therapy and specialized schooling that her son has ever been able to have or get into. The thing that he has brought into his family’s life and the life of all their friends which his father said best, “He has taught us genuine love.” I know that is all I feel when I am with him. God Bless these beautiful children and their families.

    Reply

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