Alyson Hannigan Plans For Home Birth, Talks Potty Training

Alyson Hannigan Plans For Home Birth, Talks Potty Training

Year after year, Alyson Hannigan, her husband Alexis Denisof and their adorable daughter Satyana dominate our year-end Readers’ Choice Awards. And now we have even more reason to celebrate: the How I Met Your Mother star is currently expecting the couple’s second child this summer.

Alyson opens up to Celebrity Baby Scoop about partnering with Pull-Ups for the Potty Dance, remaining mum on baby’s gender, her “fantastic” and “hilarious” daughter Satyana who turns 3 next month, and her plans for a second home birth: “I think that the home is the best place for me to feel comfortable.”

CBS: Tell us all about Pull-Ups and the Potty Dance.

AH: “I’ve partnered with Pull-Ups for the Potty Dance Party. It’s a really great way to encourage parents to pick a day and start potty training. They’ve done a great job at making it as fun as possible by coming up with this potty dance and a song. You can go to Pull-Ups.com and teach your child the fun song and dance. It’s all about making it as fun as possible and less daunting.”

CBS: Is Satyana potty trained?

AH: “During the day she’s – I want to say – 100 percent potty trained. We haven’t had an accident in a long time. But we haven’t started the nighttime yet. I’ll pick a day, but not while I’m working because I’m already sleep-deprived!”

CBS: Congratulations on your second pregnancy! How are you feeling?

AH: “Thank you! I’m feeling tired, but great. We’re so excited! Satyana is going to be a fantastic big sister and we’re really looking forward to that.”

CBS: When are you due? Do you know gender yet?

AH: “I’m due in the summer. We know [gender] but we haven’t announced it to the world, but Satyana might because she’ll tell anybody. But for now, we’re keeping that to ourselves.”

CBS: Are you planning another home birth with a midwife? Did you receive lots of negative comments about your choice to have a home birth?

AH: “Yes, that is the plan. Hopefully all will go well. And yes, we had lots of comments about it. And we had the doctor that scared us tremendously. There was definitely more concern the first time around. For me, that was just the perfect place. I am absolutely terrified of hospitals. so I think that the home is the best place for me to feel comfortable. I had a midwife, her assistant and a doula. It will be the same again this time.”

CBS: How’s Satyana doing?

AH: “She’s fantastic; she’s hilarious! She’s going to be 3 next month and she’s just the best. She’s very excited about the baby and already showing signs of being a fantastic big sister. She rubs and talks to my belly. It’s so sweet.”

CBS: Do you have any plans for her upcoming third birthday party?

AH: “I’ve been trying to figure out the best birthday party. But I think we might actually just do a trip to Disneyland with a few close friends instead of a big party. I think that would be really special for her and for all of us.”

CBS: Awhile ago, you said you weren’t sure about having a second child. What sealed the deal for you and Alexis?

AH: “Honestly, when she was younger I didn’t want to share. I wanted her to have all of me. And now she’s a little girl and so much more independent and self-sufficient. I see that she was ready, which made me ready.

I was an only child and I hated it, so I always wanted her to have a sibling. But I just wasn’t ready when she was a baby. I wanted to give her those years.”

CBS: What are some of your favorite motherhood moments with Satyana?

AH: “There’s so many in a day. It’s hard to choose any of them, but they’re all so special. I love her perspective on life and I love getting to be a part of her world. She’s just such a sweet, sweet person and I love the things that come out of her mouth. She’s just so full of personality and so lovely. [Motherhood is] just the greatest thing ever!”

CBS: We just saw some pictures of Satyana dressed up like a princess. You don’t seem like a princess-pushing kind of mama!

AH: “I know! We support whatever she’s into. I thought it wasn’t going to happen because she didn’t really care about clothes, and then one day it was all about whatever she wants to wear! She went to a friend’s house and they had a lot of dress-up clothes. And that was it – she was set!

So we got her a couple little princess dresses and she loves them! She picks them out all the time and insists on wearing them, like when we go get our little Boba drinks.

I support whatever she wants. If she wants to wear striped tights with a tutu, then she can do that. I love her expressions, so I embrace it. As long as she’s going to be warm enough, she can wear whatever she wants.”

Check out the Pull-Ups YouTube channel to share personal potty training stories and other Big Kid experiences.

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Filed under: Alyson Hannigan,Celebrity Interview,Exclusives

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  1. Anonymous

    Aaaww Satyana looks like a little doll baby!

    I’m saddened but not at all surprised to hear Allison say her doctor tried to scare her into not having a home birth. Sadly many of them do. Trying to exert control over women’s bodies.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      How is giving realistic medical advice trying to exert control over women’s bodies? I’m sure that doctor has seen many more maternal haemorrhages, babies with brain damage or death, and NICU admissions than Alyson, you, or I have. They have a better understanding of what can happen during birth because they’ve seen it all… whereas most women only experience a handful of births (their own) and lay midwives might only experience a hundred a year (at best). That’s not a very large sample size to draw conclusions from.

      That said, I wish Alyson the best if homebirthing is what she feels most comfortable with. I just hope she has a good emergency plan and close access to the hospital if it becomes necessary.

      Reply
      • AJ

        I do agree with your sentiment that I hope Alyson has access to medical attention should it become necessary, but it’s probably safe to say that she does, she seems pretty level-headed. That being said, the majority of the medical world has turned pregnancy into a condition or an illness and the fear-mongering is insane. Both of my sisters had healthy pregnancies, of course with regular checkups and vitamins, but then they had horrific experiences once they set foot in the hospital, with doctors and nurses (and I truly have respect for their professions, but I don’t always agree with the medical world) who wanted to rush the babies out in really invasive ways, instead of letting things progress naturally. With the right research done and right people involved, home births can be excellent ways to bring your baby to the world.

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          But that’s just the thing, it’s not fear mongering if it’s based on statistics. An individual woman might feel that her risk of an unexpected* emergency is low because she has never had an emergency and she doesn’t personally know anyone who has. But a doctor sees thousands of patients in their career, among them women who had catastrophic complications resulting in death or disability. Statistics that occur in only a few patients per thousand are like that. It’s not “fear mongering” for them to want to prevent it from occurring to you. Personally I want to be monitored to ensure that doctors can act *before* an emergency takes place, when the outcome will be best, rather than needing to step in when things have already gone wrong.

          As for the medical world turning pregnancy into a condition or illness… Well, it is definitely a condition. It’s an altered physiological state and the body is functioning very differently to how it normally would. What’s more, the baby is in a uniquely vulnerable position, sustained only through by the placenta. It has claimed the lives of thousands of women throughout history and for that reason alone it should be thought of as a condition which the medical community should be involved in managing. I don’t know anyone who would want to go back to the days when women routinely died during childbirth.

          *note that I said an unexpected emergency, not just having low risk in a well documented risk factor like gestational diabetes, etc.

          Reply
      • Anonymous

        Realistic medical advice? I’ll just throw one example at you: Do you know how many doctors want to induce labor if you go three days past what they have determined is your “due date”? 95% of them.

        For the VAST majority of women, labor should be an event that is not hindered or helped by doctors, nurses or anyone else UNLESS there is cause.

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          A post-term pregnancy is a risk factor in and of itself. Hence, there is a reason for inducing labor. The placenta becomes steadily more vulnerable to detaching as the due date comes and goes, and rarely can you predict if/when a catastrophic event will occur. Statistically speaking, going past your due date will increase your risk, so to ensure a good outcome for the patient, it’s deemed good practice to intervene *before* a problem occurs. Doctors haven’t reached that consensus because they enjoy intervening in a woman’s “natural process” but because it reduces the risk of death, simple as that.

          I had my wisdom teeth surgically removed last year, actually. They weren’t causing me any problems but my dental surgeon wanted to have them out now, while I’m still young, to prevent me from running into potentially serious problems later on. It’s considered good practice among dental surgeons to remove wisdom teeth preventatively if it’s deemed the risk factors for issues issues developing later are high, even if there are no problems *now*. Thousands of young people have the same procedure. Yet it’s interfering in a natural process, right? People have always had wisdom teeth. Maybe I should have just waited for the natural process to progress until one day I have excruciating pain from impacted teeth, infections, and risk of death through sepsis.

          Reply
      • Anonymous

        “How is giving realistic medical advice trying to exert control over women’s bodies?”

        Giving medical advice is one thing. Scaring a woman when she states she wants to have a home birth is something else entirely. And I have seen first hand the ways in which ob/gyns try to control mothers (not fully informing them about their options, exagerrating minor issues so that they become scared and will succumb to whatever the doctos suggests, manipulating mothers into choosing to induce, manipulating mothers into choosing a c-section, threatening them with c-sections, casually mentioning that if she doesn’t do xyz her baby will die, the list goes ON).

        In most/many cases there is minimal to no risk giving birth at home. To frighten a woman considering home birth is to say “You don’t know how to make good decisions for yourself. So I need control of your birth.” Plain and simple. Women are already vulnerable when they are pregnant. Doctors know this. It’s actually very simple to inform as oppose to frighten if the doctor takes care and decides to do so. It’s also really simple to scare a future mother (especially if she is a first-time future mother) into doing what you’d like her to do. If Allison had said “my doctor informed me of the risks and I still chose to home birth” that would be something else. She said she was “scared tremendously.” These are not slight words. If you think it’s standard practice and perfectly fine to tremendously scare a new future mother, then we just have to part ways in our thinking.

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          “Scaring a woman when she states she wants to have a home birth is something else entirely.”

          If the only thing a woman has been reading are NCB books and websites, of course she’ll be scared by what an actual doctor has to tell her. Suffering complications during birth or losing your baby are frightening things, after all, but that doesn’t mean they don’t happen.

          “To frighten a woman considering home birth is to say “You don’t know how to make good decisions for yourself. So I need control of your birth.” Plain and simple.”

          If a woman has never been told about the risks associating with childbirth then she can’t be making a fully informed decision, by definition. Someone who has “researched” by looking at NCB websites and made the decision to homebirth isn’t necessarily making a “good decision”, as you put it, because they don’t fully understand the risks and it’s the responsibility of the doctor to make sure that she understands them.

          I don’t know what the doctor told Alyson so I can’t comment on that specifically. But just because she was scared by what he said doesn’t mean he was manipulating her. She could have been scared simply by him informing her of the risks, because the risks are scary.

          Reply
          • Anonymous

            there are risks associated with everything. something bad could happen at any time throughout my life. i don’t consult a doctor about the perceived riskiness of walking down the street. why does everything suddenly change when a woman is pregnant? i’m far more likely to die on my way to work everyday than i am during childbirth. if doctors want to explain the “risks” associated with childbirth, they should also explain that many of the risks are a direct result of medical intervention.

          • Anonymous

            “why does everything suddenly change when a woman is pregnant?”

            A pregnant woman’s body is under incredible stress. Her blood volume doubles, her kidneys and liver need to work twice as hard. That’s why it’s a altered physiological condition, and medicine is concerned with physiological conditions.

            “i’m far more likely to die on my way to work everyday than i am during childbirth.”

            If you’re receiving medical care, that’s probably true. On the other hand if you’re attempting an unassisted birth, statistics suggest driving to work is the less risky option.

            “many of the risks are a direct result of medical intervention.”

            No, they’re not.

          • Anonymous

            “Medicine is the science of healing.” medicine is concerned with illness and healing. pregnant women aren’t sick, they’re just pregnant. her body is supposed to be under some physical “stress” and her body is perfectly capable of handling it.

            your statistics are wrong. in 2005, 440 women died due to childbirth complications in the u.s. that same year, 43,443 people died in car accidents in the u.s. (world health organization)

            routine medical intervention is unnecessary in most cases and their overuse is why the u.s. has the highest maternal mortality rate in the developed world.

          • Anonymous

            When was the last time you took a stats class? You’re comparing absolute numbers, not risk. The number of women who died due to childbirth complications is only useful as a ratio against the number of women who gave birth during that year. That’s not a very large population (it automatically rules out 50 per cent of the population – all men – for a start, not to mention every girl who is pre-puberty and woman who is post- menopause, not to mention every single woman who isn’t pregnant!) On the other hand, the number of people who drove or were passengers in a vehicle during that year includes virtually the entire US population.

            Come back to me with the actual risk and then I might take you seriously.

          • Anonymous

            OP: Doctors DO try to scare women into delivering prematurely. I have worked in a hospital around doctors for a few years. I spent some time on the family maternity floor, and some of the things I saw were crazy! Doctors are seeing more and more patients now, so they don’t have “time” for women to be in labor for 30 hours. They may have three people due in one week, so someone else being overdue may end up cutting into their schedule if she goes into labor that week. I once overheard a doctor urging a woman who had been in labor for 15 hours to consider a c-section. She said she really wanted to do it naturally no matter how long it took. Later in the hallway, I heard him telling the nurse to notify him of any changes (no matter how big or small) so that he can convince her to have a c-section. Her blood pressure went up by a small fraction, and an hour later she was being rushed in for an “emergency c-section.” At the time, I was just a student, but it was horrifying to watch that mother so upset that she couldn’t deliver naturally. For the most part, our bodies are able to tell us when the right time to go into labor is. I know many very small women who went into preterm labor and had five pound babies. My belief is that if the baby had remained in the womb until term, it would have been too big for that woman to deliver. It is just how our bodies have evolved to work. We are MEANT for childbirth. Yes, things do go wrong and it is best to have a back up plan, but you cannot knock midwives at all! They go through as much training as a doctor does, but their concentration is completely in dealing with pregnancies and labor. Doctors go through general school before they choose their specialty. They see thousands of births as well since they work in homes and hospitals.

  2. Luisa

    Satyana is so cute!!! <3

    Reply
  3. klutzy_girl

    Awesome interview! Like that she’s planning another homebirth and love their reasoning for waiting to have another baby. Wonder what they’re having this time around.

    Reply
  4. Anonymous

    Go Alyson! I love to hear that. I’ll be having a home birth as well (HWBAC), any day now (will be 38 weeks tomorrow.) I’m sure it’s not for everyone, but I totally feel her on the feeling more relaxed and comfortable at home than at hospitals aspect.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    She’s so great, thank you for the interview!

    Reply
  6. Anonymous

    She seems like one of the most down to earth celebrity moms, and her and her husband always appear to still be so in love and such good parents. It’s nice to see people actually making it work while still having successful careers in hollywood! Best of luck to Alyson and her family!

    Reply
  7. lori

    I am a 50 year old female who is married to a man that is 28 years old. We met on Sugarm/ommylove.comsince I was 21. I fell in love with her shortly after meeting her and I love her more now than before. This is the most complete and loving relationship I have ever had. And to a person that posted before, I didn’t have any trouble getting girls my own age. And I do emphasize “girls”. Most women my age are not ready for a mature relationship even if they say they are. All they want to do is play house but when real life finally knocks on the door they don’t want anything to do with it. Age doesn’t have as much to do with the relationship as one would think. My wife and I both love and respect each other regardless of our ages and neither of us have ever been so happy.

    Reply
  8. jan

    I am a 50 year old female who is married to a man that is 28 years old. We met on Sugarm/ommylove.com,since I was 21. I fell in love with her shortly after meeting her and I love her more now than before. This is the most complete and loving relationship I have ever had. And to a person that posted before, I didn’t have any trouble getting girls my own age. And I do emphasize “girls”. Most women my age are not ready for a mature relationship even if they say they are. All they want to do is play house but when real life finally knocks on the door they don’t want anything to do with it. Age doesn’t have as much to do with the relationship as one would think. My wife and I both love and respect each other regardless of our ages and neither of us have ever been so happy.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      Good on Alyson!! if more parents thought about the joys of parent hood, they would find their inner happyness. Life is short, and children are a part of you :)

      Reply
  9. Anonymous

    Good for Alyson for having a home birth!! I had a home birth in January and it was the best experience of my life. She is my favorite actress, such a great role model for all mothers!

    Reply

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