Jenny McCarthy To Pen Parenting Column

Celebrities Attend The 2xist Underwear Fashion Show

Jenny McCarthy has landed a position as a parenting advice blogger and columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times. The model-actress turned autism activist will be doling out her parenting wisdom, writing a weekly “Dear Jenny” advice column for the paper’s online Splash magazine, The Washington Post reports.

No stranger to controversy, the activist mama told Celebrity Baby Scoop that her now 10-year-old son Evan has “recovered” from autism.

The Playboy model is one of the leading voices of the movement arguing that autism is linked to childhood vaccinations. This theory has been widely discredited in the scientific community.

“I know children regress after vaccination because it happened to my own son,” Jenny wrote in a 2011 blog post for the Huffington Post. “Why aren’t there any tests out there on the safety of how vaccines are administered in the real world, six at a time? Why have only two of the 36 shots our kids receive been looked at for their relationship to autism?”

Jenny’s son was diagnosed with autism when he was 2 ½-years-old. The single mom has publicly spoken about the link between childhood immunizations and autism. She is also well-known for saying that children can “recover” from autism.

Has the community embraced her since Evan’s recovery — and her controversial statement?

“My story of Evan’s recovery is not unique, there are thousands of parents before me whose shoulders I stand on today,” Jenny said. “I’m just as active today as when Evan recovered from autism. I still travel the country lecturing on autism, am the president and board member of Generation Rescue and actively fundraise throughout the country for the foundation. My journey now is for the other parents whose voice hasn’t been heard.”

What do you think about Jenny’s new gig? Will you read her blogs?

Filed under: Featured,Jenny McCarthy

Photo credit: FameFlynet

12 Comments »»

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  1. HDP

    Good work Jenny!

    I think there is so much still to be discovered about the link between vaccinations and autism.
    People love to put their fingers in their ears and shout “La La La, vaccines are 100% safe because my doctor told me so.” – but they can only kid themselves so much.

    You don’t have to be “anti vaccines” to realize that there have been some serious pay offs to avoid a credible in depth look into the risks of vaccines and how they relate to the trigger of autism, and that we DO NOT know the full effects these chemicals can have on children’s bodies.

    Reply
    • Alison K

      I havent seen any proof at all that immunizations cause autism, its a myth. And not just my doctor, but 99% of doctors will tell you that. You think they’re all being secretly paid under the tabel to tell you that?? No.

      Reply
    • KTGrace

      If you honestly believe there is a link between autism and vaccines, then you’d better be ready to explain the autism in children who have never been vaccinated. There are plenty of them and if it’s not the vaccine (and clearly it’s not), there is something else at play here.

      Reply
    • Kate O

      The doctor who published a supposed link between vaccinations and autism has been proven as 100% false and the doctor was stripped of his medical license. Maybe believe a doctor over a former playboy model. People like her spurting dangerous misinformation about vaccines is detrimental to society- we have come to far to almost eradicate diseases like small pox yet people would like to believe angry parents with NO SCIENTIFIC OR MEDICAL support over the medical community. righto.

      Reply
  2. Reilly

    Oh dear god. I hope no one is dumb enough to read the crap she spews. I know they will, though, as evidenced by the damage she has done thus far. What a waste.

    Reply
  3. Amanda

    Great job Jenny!
    1 in 5 American boys is in special education and out of all industrialized nations our children have the highest level of chronic illnesses. We have most vaccinated children on the planet. We can do better than this.

    Reply
    • Daniella

      Yeah, but we also have almost no cases of smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, diphtheria, hepatitis A & B, pertussis, rabies, rotavirus, tetanus, or many types of meningitis anymore in the United States. If you combine those childhood diseases together, historically, they used to kill about 3 in every 10 children before they reached adulthood. And in the case of the viral diseases, they still persisted even after good sanitation was introduced. Any class on virology, bacteriology, epidemiology, or pathology blatantly shows this.

      Overdiagnosis of autism seems to be a new trend, just like ADD & ADHD were a decade or so ago. It appears that any child with developmental or behavioral problems is now put onto the spectrum.

      Reply
  4. Sheala

    Vaccinations do NOT cause autisim. Maybe we should be focusing more on finding the actual cause of autism and stop wasting time on this conspiracy theory

    Reply
  5. An33

    Why would they give this idiot a soapbox for her to spew her dribble from? If her kid was “cured”, then he probably was not autistic to begin with; there are many developmental and behavioral issues that are often confused/mistaken/lumped into the autism spectrum, which is also a reason why autism numbers have skyrocketed.

    Reply
    • KTGrace

      I think it’s easy to see why she thinks he was “cured”. Autism is a whole host of behavioral, psychological, social and physical issues. She’s got the best therapies available to her and if she can “fix” some of the more outward signs, he may appear “cured”.

      But she cannot claim he is scientifically cured since she won’t allow him to be examined (not that I blame her for that).

      Reply
  6. anonymous

    Vaccination rates have dropped, but autism rates have not. Meanwhile, illnesses like whooping cough, measles, and chicken pox have gone up. These are not just minor illnesses – they’re far more risky to the life and health of a child than complications from vaccines.

    The autism link has been disproven. It’s ridiculous to give this woman any more opportunity to promote her completely misinformed views.

    Reply
  7. Lilou

    Ooooh great idea! She can call it “I’ve killed over 1,000 children, and you can too!” Subtitle: “Raising kids in ignorance and fear”

    Reply

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