Elizabeth Banks: “Women Should Not Be Expected To Bounce Back”

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The urgency to lose baby weight in Hollywood is almost as serious as an Oscar win. And one of our favorite celebrity moms, The Hunger Games star Elizabeth Banks, weighs in on society’s obsession with post-baby bodies.

The actress’ quote that she’s “really a mom” now that she has two children made headlines last week. But now, she’s speaking out on the media’s attention on celebrity moms “bouncing back” quickly after a pregnancy.

During a recent podcast interview, Elizabeth talked to host Marc Maron about welcoming her second child, son Magnus, via gestational surrogate in November 2012.

After Maron said he was surprised to see her “really up and out” considering she has a newborn at home, Elizabeth took the opportunity to discuss the pressure women feel to “bounce back” after pregnancy.

“I’d like to believe that if I had carried my own baby, I would have bounced back. But who knows?” Elizabeth said.

“And by the way, it’s such a horrible — women should not be expected to bounce back,” she added. “It’s a true disservice what’s going on right now with all these celebrity moms. First of all, I just want to remind people that celebrities generally are genetically superior human beings on a certain level anyway. They’re mostly thin — they’ve got trainers, they work out, they’ve got money, they’ve got the ability and they are normally genetically predisposed to being thin people anyway. So like these women who are holding up certain people as their benchmark after they’ve had a child… just go be with your kid for a minute. Don’t get to the gym right away. It’s alright. This is not how it’s supposed to be, everybody. Calm down.”

Celebrity Baby Scoop’s new spinoff blog, HerScoop, has called on the media to stop shaming women’s postpartum bodies as well.

“I wish the urgent desire to quickly drop pregnancy weight would go away,” HerScoop says. “This is madness — a woman has just welcomed a baby!”

“We should encourage new moms to recover from pregnancy, and blissfully bond with her baby. We should not create and perpetuate superficial, unrealistic and shallow body images for women and girls.”

Filed under: Elizabeth Banks

Photo credit: FameFlynet

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  1. sierra

    I don’t know if celebrities are genetically superior. I know and have seen a lot of people just in upstate ny that are better looking than celebrities, with great bodies. My husband, for example, I think he is much better looking than some hot women celebrities husbands. Anyone can have the body they want, it just takes a lot more work and dedication for some ppl. But I do agree that women should focus on their baby, and not worry about the weight so much, that creates way too much stress. It also makes a difference how u take care of yourself during your pregnancy. I mean, if you eat like Jessica Simpson, you will gain 70 lbs. Thad not healthy either.

    Reply
  2. courtney

    boo hoo Lizzy needs to realize it comes with the business she chose to be in and shut her mouth seeing as she had to use a surrogate to have her children. if an actress doesn’t lose the pregnancy weight quickly she won’t be able to get work it’s not how it was nearly 50 years ago when Talent more closely dictated weather a star was hired then their weight did. when Joanne Woodward was hired to play Sean Connery’s wife ithe movie a fine Madness shortly after the birth of her youngest daughter she weighed 164lbs and the studios couldn’t say Jack shit about it because she was a huge star and nursing her baby and her metabolism had slowed down because she was over 35

    Reply
  3. KAS

    He looks just like Ever Treadway, Alanis Morissette’s son!! Wow!

    Reply
  4. Elle

    that baby does not look like he is biologically hers.

    Reply
  5. jennie

    She’s not really in a position to be pontificating and opining on the subject when she used surrogates herself. Very strange that she’d put her thoughts out there on this topic. Comes across as being very patronizing.

    Reply
  6. kamila

    All the debate aside, I think she has a point. There’s a lot of pressure on women to lose the baby weight and get their bodies back and for many, it’s not just realistic. I had a baby almost 11 months ago (my first) and my body is still not feeling like it did before I was pregnant and I can’t seem to drop the last 5 or 10 lbs of baby weight (out of 60 lbs with a 10 lb baby!). I’ve had to work VERY hard at the gym, eat right, etc., and it’s still taken a year. I think more women need to stand up and say ‘hey it’s ok to not bounce back immediately’ without shame!

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      You gained *60* pounds. Of course it’ll take forever to get the weight off. There’s no reason to gain that much weight (and the size of your baby has little to nothing to do with how much weight you gain).

      Reply
      • Kimber

        Whoa, wait a minute! Give this girl a break! Every woman is different. I have a couple friends who gained 60-70lbs with all of their pregnancies and literally snapped back into their size zero clothes in a couple months. They ate healthy and stayed active but every time 60+ lbs. I just had my third a few weeks ago and didn’t watch my diet but gained 18lbs and lost all the weight in a week. A lot of it is genetic! The point is we as women should support and encourage one another!

        Reply
        • Anonymous

          Weight gain is not ‘genetic’. Do you people make this stuff up as you go along? Weight gain is a simple calories in / calories out equation. I know that plenty of people would like to believe it’s more complicated than that, but with the exception of pregnancy complications that might cause excess water retention, the only way you gain 60 pounds is by overeating.

          You DON’T gain 60 pounds in 9 months by eating 2500 calories a day, remaining active, eating plenty of fiber, not too much sugar and salt, exercising daily (you know, all the things non-pregnant people do).

          You. Just. Don’t.

          Sorry you don’t like that answer, but I didn’t invent the biological laws that make this so.

          Reply
        • PaminPA

          Did you ever see those shows about the people who weigh 600 lbs and INSIST they eat the same amount as everyone else? Yet, they are constantly shown eating a whole pizza, keeping 2-litre bottles of soda by their bed, and consuming meals big enough for an entire family?

          Yeah, it’s called denial.

          Reply
    • Kimber

      Good for you!

      Reply
  7. Elle

    So stop making it seem abnormal when a woman easily DOES lose it. It seems to be the last publicly acceptable judgement. My grandma (and others for that matter, typically over the age of 50 or overweight themselves) will comment on my thinness (read: fit-ness), and how I need to gain some weight. But that same person wouldn’t think of telling someone to their face that they’re heavy and need to lose weight.

    Discrimination goes both ways and I’m tired of getting shit for only gaining 25 lbs during pregnancy (I started out at 110 lbs at 5’4, was back at 108 within 3 days). Some of us have high metabolisms, like to eat healthy, and work out daily. Yes, all three factors can exist in harmony, and that doesn’t make someone
    weird or worthy of vilification.

    Reply

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